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Ezekiel "Zeke" Painter

Male 1808 - 1886  (78 years)


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  • Name Ezekiel "Zeke" Painter 
    Born 1808  Pennsylvania Find all individuals with events at this location  [1, 2
    Gender Male 
    1840 Census Milton Twp., Jefferson County, Indiana Find all individuals with events at this location  [3
    1850 Census Probably Franklin Co., Indiana Find all individuals with events at this location  [4
    Misc. 1837  Moved from Boone County, Kentucky to Jefferson County, Indiana Find all individuals with events at this location  [5, 6
    Emigrated 1857  From Franklin County, Indiana to Missouri Find all individuals with events at this location  [7
    1860 Census 17 Aug 1860  District No. 18, Callaway County, Missouri Find all individuals with events at this location  [8
    1870 Census 25 Jun 1870  Danville Twp., Montgomery County, Missouri Find all individuals with events at this location  [9
    Misc. (2) 1877  Pensioner due to son's death in Civil War Find all individuals with events at this location  [10, 11
    1880 Census 17 Jun 1880  Danville Twp., Montgomery County, Missouri Find all individuals with events at this location  [12
    HIST 1840 Jefferson Co., IN Census, Milton Twp, Pg. 172, Ezekiel PAYNTER 10001 12001
    [1M 20-29 (b. 1811-1820) Ezekiel
    1F 20-29 (b. 1811-1820) Jane
    2F 5-9 (b. 1831-1835) Aveline & Louisa
    1F 0-4 (b. 1836-1840)
    1M 0-4 (b. 1836-1840) William]
    (same township as his father Benjamin and brothers David and Isaac).


    1850 - cannot find Zeke or his relatives. Believe their Franklin Co., IN neighborhood was missed by the census.


    1860 Callaway Co., MO Census, District No. 18, pg. 152/930
    17 August 1860 by John Berry
    P.O. WmsBurg
    line 19, 1009/1042 E. PAINTER 53 M Farmer 300/200 Pa
    Olla 35 F Indianna
    William 21 M " [Indianna]
    David 12 M " [Indianna]
    Elizabeth 10 F " [Indianna]
    Isaac 8 M " [Indianna]
    Ezekiel 4 " [Indianna]
    line 26, 1010/1043 Margaret 1 F Mo
    Elizabeth LARY 50 F Farmer 200/100 Va
    Wilson F. 16 M Ind
    line 29, 1011/1044 James McCLAFFERTY 2 Farmer 200/300 " [Indianna]
    Anna 21 F " [Indianna]
    Ellen T. 5 F " [Indianna]
    Elizabeth 3 F " [Indianna]
    James F. 2 M Mo
    line 34, 1012/1045 Eada McCLAFFERTY 62 F Farmer 500/30 Va
    Maria BROCK 8 F Indianna
    Benjamin RADER 24 M Farmer 200/200 " [Indianna]
    Margaret 30 F " [Indianna]
    John 5/12 M Mo.

    1870 Montgomery Co., MO Census, Danville Twp., Page No. 54
    25 June 1870 by Benjamin Palmer
    P.O. Danville MO
    line 4, 364/364 PAINTER Ezekiel 62 MW Farmer 600/550 Pensylvania
    Olive 44 FW Keepinghouse Indiana
    David 22 MW Laborer Indiana
    Elizabeth 20 FW Indiana
    Isaac 17 MW school Indiana attended school
    Ezekiel 12 MW Missouri attended school
    Ann 11 FW Missouri attended school
    Henrietta 8 FW Missouri, Francis 5 FW Missouri
    Jane 4 FW Missouri
    Samuel 1 MW Missouri
    Martha 4 FW Missouri.

    1880 Montgomery Co., MO Census, Page No. 25/48A
    S.D. 3
    E.D. 109
    Danville Township, County of Montgomery, State of Missouri
    17th June 1880 by Jno B Harris
    line 44, 209/211 PAINTER Ezeikel WM 73 M Farmer cannot write Penn Penn Penn
    Olive WF 55 wife M Keepinghouse Ind Ind Ind
    Margarett WF 18 Daught S Keeping house Mo Penn Ind
    Olive F WF 14 Daught S assisting in housekeeping attended school Mo Penn Ind
    Elmira J WF 12 Daught S assisting in housekeeping attended school Mo Penn Ind
    Grant WM 11 son S works on farm attended school Mo Penn Ind
    Page No. 24/[48B]
    line 1, 209/211 PAINTER Isaac WM 25 son M Farmer Ind Penn Ind
    Nancy E WF 20 Daughter in law M Keeping house Ind Ind Ind
    Everett WM 3 grandson S Mo Ind Ind. 
    Died 16 Mar 1886  Montgomery County, Missouri Find all individuals with events at this location  [13
    Buried Painter Family Cemetery, Danville, Montgomery County, Missouri Find all individuals with events at this location  [14, 15
    Person ID I1264  Our Genealogy
    Last Modified 11 Nov 2011 

    Father Benjamin Painter,   b. Abt 1772, Pennsylvania Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Apr 1860, probably Jefferson County, Indiana Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 88 years) 
    Mother Mrs. [Painter],   b. BET. 1785 - 1794, Pennsylvania Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Bef 1821  (Age ~ 26 years) 
    Married Bef 1808  Probably Pennsylvania Find all individuals with events at this location  [16
    Family ID F554  Group Sheet

    Family 1 Jane Rowan,   b. BET. 1811 - 1820, Boone County, Kentucky Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 10 Nov 1840, Madison, Jefferson County, Indiana Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 20 years) 
    Married 24 Jun 1830  Boone County, Kentucky Find all individuals with events at this location  [17
    Children 
     1. Aveline Arrena Painter,   b. Abt 1831, Indiana Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Bef 1860  (Age ~ 28 years)
     2. Louisa Jane Painter,   b. Jun 1833, Indiana Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1 Nov 1914, Dawson, Lac Qui Parle County, Minnesota Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 81 years)
     3. William C. Painter,   b. 1837, Probably Indiana Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 4 Nov 1863, Military Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 26 years)
     4. [Female] Painter,   b. bet. 1836-1840, Indiana Find all individuals with events at this location
    Last Modified 18 Sep 2014 
    Family ID F553  Group Sheet

    Family 2 Olly McCafferty,   b. 10 Jun 1825, Franklin County, Indiana Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Jan 1890, Montgomery County, Missouri Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 64 years) 
    Married 2 May 1844  Franklin County, Indiana Find all individuals with events at this location  [18
    Children 
     1. David Painter,   b. 15 Dec 1847, Franklin County, Indiana Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 16 Dec 1928, Tulsa, Tulsa County, Oklahoma Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 81 years)
     2. Sarah Elizabeth Painter,   b. 13 Mar 1850, Frankin County, Indiana Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 27 Feb 1911, Montgomery County, Missouri Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 60 years)
     3. Isaac James "Ike" Painter,   b. 17 Sep 1851, Franklin County, Indiana Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 12 May 1910, Clinton County, Missouri Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 58 years)
     4. Richard Ezekiel "Dick" Painter,   b. 1855, Franklin County, Indiana Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1876, Montgomery County, Missouri Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 21 years)
     5. Margaret Ann "Maggie" Painter,   b. Abt 1858, probably Callaway County, Missouri Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Abt 1885, probably Montgomery County, Missouri Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 27 years)
     6. Henrietta Painter,   b. 29 Jun 1861, Williamsburg, Montgomery County, Missouri Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 21 Dec 1945, Americus, Montgomery County, Missouri Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 84 years)
     7. Ollie Frances "Fannie" Painter,   b. 16 Dec 1863, Montgomery County, Missouri Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 17 Mar 1957, St. Charles Nurse Home?, St. Charles, St. Charles County, Missouri Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 93 years)
     8. Elmira Jane "Jennie" Painter,   b. 28 Jun 1868, Danville, Montgomery County, Missouri Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 29 Jun 1933, near Danville, Danville Twp., Montgomery County, Missouri Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 65 years)
     9. Ulysses Samuel Grant "Grant" Painter,   b. 22 Sep 1869, Montgomery County, Missouri Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 8 Jan 1935, Rapid City, Pennington County, South Dakota Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 65 years)
    Last Modified 18 Sep 2014 
    Family ID F482  Group Sheet

  • Headstones
    Plot of grave locations at the Ezekiel Painter homestead
    Plot of grave locations at the Ezekiel Painter homestead
    Information provided by Fannie Painter Oliver, daughter of Ezekiel Painter

  • Notes 
    • Stories of Zeke Painter, friends and family
      by William Thomas Painter (1874-1956)
      undated

      About 1850 a community in Franklin County, Indiana, were very much interested in stories of rich farm lands of Missouri and Kansas that could be acquired by homestead by families who would live on and improve them.

      Men of adventure had traveled west to hunt and trap and trade with Indians, and returning would tell of the very productive lands out west. It so happened that a number of families from southeast Indiana prepared a wagon train, and in the spring of 1857 drove through to Kansas, and some wrote back to friends telling of rich lands and opportunities in Kansas.

      So in the fall of 1857 another band of settlers decided to go west. They secured the necessary equipment, teams and wagons, and in September droveaway from their native haunts, leaving friends and relatives. Included in this band were a number of people who were destined to take leading parts in many events in the development of the middle west - Ezekiel Painter, Wm. Nicholson, and others.

      In 1857 steamboats carried a lot of freight on the Ohio, Mississippi andMissouri rivers. Many pioneers earned money by cutting wood and supplying the fuel for steamboats. Also by handling freight at the lands. In that early date railroads and highways were not often seen bythe pioneers.

      Travel was very slow - Zeke Painter had a son Bill. At that time Bill was 20 years of age and a giant, endowed with super strength. Zeke secured employment by a steamboat company, and worked on the Ohio, Mississippi and Missouri Rivers. He worked his way west to Westport Landing that is now Kansas City, MO. Zeke's plan was to work and earn some money while the wagon train was slowly moving west. They had decided to go to Kansas and would pass through Westport and meet other settlers there, hold a council as to just where they would locate and purchase necessary supplies. So off goes Zeke on a steamboat, trusting his family and property to his son Bill and other relatives and friends.

      Zeke also had a daughter named Louise who was at that time 18 years ofage, and married to Wm. Nicholson, and in her arms she carried a littleson named George. Bill and Louise were Zeke's children by a first wife who died about 1843, and Zeke had married a second wife, Ollie McCafferty, and at the time of the westward move they had four children: David, the oldest, was about 10 years of age and a favorite of his half-sister Louise, and David was very fond of his half-sister Louise, and also very much attached to little George. Now Wm. Nicholson andbrother John and a number of others had decided to go to Minnesota assome others had gone on before, and persuaded them to settle in thatState.

      All traveled in one wagon train to western Illinois, then the Nicholsonsand others drove north, while Painters, McCaffertys, Learys, Raders, and others drove on west, crossing the Mississippi River above St. Louis on a ferry. But that parting was sad indeed for little David Painter as his loved his half-sister Louise who had always been like a mother to him.Yet he was comforted by his own dear Mother and big half-brother Bill just worshipped David. David and Louise never met again. There were others who parted there, never to meet again.

      As travel was so slow and difficult, money and leisure time were nat as they are in this modern age.

      After crossing the Mississippi River, they noticed two dogs that had been with them were absent. They wrote back to southeast Indiana and asked about the doges, and sure enough the dogs made their way back to Indiana, well over 200 miles. At St. Charles they crossed the Missouri River byferry, and there David was riding horseback and it so happened that a brass band struck up some music. David's horse wad frightened and so was David as that was the first brass band that many of the emigrants had every heard.

      But Uncle Ben Rader was there and a real horseman he was. He dashed to David's rescue.

      The leaders of this band of emigrants had made calculations as to howthey would progress along the trail and just about where they would be at a given time, and kept up a correspondence with friends and relatives, both back in Indiana and out west and north, and advised them as where to write. To be sure mail traveled slowly in those days, but it traveled much faster than the emigrants did. Danville, MO, was a town of importance in those days, and as the northbound travelers were to pass through Danville, they had requested others to write to them and address letters to Danville. When they reached Danville, they received bad news. Some of the emigrants who had gone to Kansas in the spring had been killed by Indians - at least that was the report. But later, other reports came - some assumed that white men killed the McCubbins and driven off their stock. Later it was a well known fact that some wicked outlaws made their rendezvous near the Kansas-Missouri border, and settlers were murdered and their stock and other valuables carried off by outlaws who tried to camouflage their crimes by insisting that the marauding Indians were the guilty parties.

      As our band plodded onward, the weather turned bad, and although it was October it snowed and travel was very difficult. So our band decided to halt and camp at or near old Williamsburg in Callaway County, MO. They wrote to Zeke Painter at Kansas City and told him to come to Williamsburg in Callaway County, MO. Well, Zeke was no scholar and he had a difficult time making sense out of that letter. But after a time he decided to return down the river to Jefferson City and join the band at Williamsburg. After receiving more letters from Kansas, they decided not to locate in Kansas. They could not travel far as weather was getting colder, funds were low and roads were very bad. Callaway County, Missouri, was not so bad. There was plenty of timber to build with and to keep fires going, good water, fertile lands, and friendly neighbors. So they settled near Williamsburg.

      They cleared land and split rails, and in the growing season they cultivated the land and produced corn, wheat, oats, tobacco, and hops.They set out orchards and vineyards, and by faithfully toiling andsaving, they secured the necessary food and clothing to live and make some progress.

      Now at this time in the years just previous to the Civil War there was noPublic Domain, or what the settlers called Government Lands in CallawayCounty. One of my uncles showed me a brick house near Danville, MO, andsaid his Great-Grand-Father had built that in 1828. So we see the land in the surrounding country had been settled for about half a centurybefore our band of emigrants arrived there.

      They were still interested in free homes and were told that in the OzarkMountains, one hundred miles or so to the south, there was yet to befound some Governments Land. The country was very rough and the settlershad selected the land that was more accessible and free from rocks. Yetas more people came in search of free lands, they gradually settled the rough rocky hills of the Ozarks.

      But before we go farther into the Ozarks, we will follow some of our settlers who remained in old Callaway and Montgomery Counties. Big Bill Painter was soon known for miles around as the strongest man among thesettlers. He could life a bigger log than any other; also out-run,out-swim, out-wrestle, out-jump, any other man that could be found. He was best with an ax or at most any manual labor.

      At log rollings, house raising, clearings, and other gatherings and contests, no one could be found who could outdo Bill Painter,and he wasquiet and modest, very kind and helpful to others. Very bashful amongladies, and often took his axe or gun and went into the forest when young ladies would come to the Painter home on visits. He had a very meager education, and never thought of trying to make money by exhibiting his great strength. He had no desire for publicity or professional honors.He enjoyed being with his folks and friends that he had known all hislife. Thoughts of highly refined society, travel and wealth were not for him. He would gladly perform feats when those who were near and dear tohim would request him to do so, as no man could be found who could throw him in a wrestle. They would gang up on him and yet he just laughed atthem. He could lay flat on his back on the ground and outstretched arms and legs and just submit to their grasping any desired hold on him, andas many as could get close enough to hold on, and when they wouldannounce they had him down and were sure they could hold him, he could roll them around as though they were just little children. He was ever careful to not seriously injure any one. But he would be up on his feet, laughing at them in a few seconds.

      But our hero joined the Union Army and went south to fight for theUnion. He was quiet and reserved among the soldiers and few of his comrades knew of his super strength. He was wounded once and went back home on a short furlough, and then returned to his regiment and gave hislife for the Union cause, and was buried near Memphis, Tennessee.

      Granny Leary was quite an old lady at the time, but was known far andnear as the champion knitting woman. She could knit faster than she could talk, and she could talk faster than any of her friends. She had away that no others attempted to imitate. This was knitting two socks atthe same time, one inside the other, and the young folks were anxious to see her toe-off her two socks at once and just keep her needles going so fast it was difficult for the eye to follow. She just started two more socks - and just kept talking. As newspapers, books and magazines were very scarce in those days, Granny Leary was the Information Bureau, and her advice and counsel were sought after by many younger women. She was a great walker and knit as she traveled. The neighbors were always glad to see her coming.

      Her son Wilson Leary was a venturesome lad and one day he was told to go to a thicket and cut a long pole with a hook on it, as the old oakenbucket had fallen in the well and the hook was to get it out. So of fwent Wilson Leary to cut a pole. But he didn't come back that day, and it was ten years later than in-walked Wilson with his long pole with a hook. He had gone far west and been successful securing employment, and was well fixed, as the settlers called it. There was rejoicing when here turned. But soon after that he and others went out west to Oregon.

      Dave McCafferty settled north of old Montgomery on a farm, but he was agood mechanic and built many buildings in the surrounding country and raised a large family. Many of his descendants are yet living. One son, John, went to Alaska in the Gold Rush of 1898 and never returned. It is generally believed that he perished in the awful cold at Chilcoot Pass.

      Nellie Hudson, a fine hand with needle embroidery, weaving loom, making willow baskets and chair seats.

      Some of the original band did go on out west to California, while othersfeared the Indians and decided to go south into the Ozarks milder climate. Few Indians, plenty of wood and water. In the early days,fence material, building material on the prairies there was none, and good water was a problem. So the Land of the Ozarks had plenty of goodwater, spring fed, clear streams and rivers, fish, timber for allpurposes.

      It is well known how the early settlers could build their houses and other buildings with just an auger and a chopping axe - they made their own furniture and wagons, with just a little metal for axles and bands. Among the early settlers who chose the Ozarks were Wm. Jacobs, Ben Barton, Dan Passer, John Bowers, Parson Kent, Nancy Kent, John Roby. They settled not far from the Gasconade River. But as thousands of acresof that land was just steep, rocky hillsides and real good soil for the production of crops was mostly in the valleys, very few homesteads were all good land. Mostly a few acres in the valley good and many acres layon rocky hillsides. Yet in some instances the settlers secured as muchas a quarter section of good land in one valley or partly on gently rolling land with few stones to bother in cultivation. Some stones were used for various purposes on the homesteads. With wagon and team with stones were gathered and used for foundations and even rock fences.


      * * * * *



      transcribed by Gordon Byers, Montgomery Co., MO 1883 Pensioners on the Roll, (noted 15 July 2005), Certificate No. 178,990, PAINTER, Ezekiel, Montgomery City, Cause for which pensioned: father, monthly rate: 8.00, Date of original allowance: Oct. 1877,
      To do:
      Obtaining Civil War Records:
      To obtain Civil War records, use Form 80. You can obtain Form 80's by sending an email request , mailto:inquire@nara.gov, and providing your name and mailing address . Be sure to specify "Form 80" and the number of forms you need. You can also obtain the NATF Form 80 by writing to: National Archives and Records Administration, Attn: NWDT1, 700 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20408-0001.

  • Sources 
    1. [S2509] Personal comment, T. Anderson Painter, Graveyard Plot drawn by Fannie Painter Oliver, 18 April 1946, notes of Wanda Gliser..

    2. [S2583] 1860 Callaway Co., MO Census.

    3. [S319] 1840 Jefferson Co., IN Census, Milton Twp, Pg. 172, Ezekiel PAYNTER 10001 12001, [1M 20-29 (b. 1811-1820) Ezekiel, 1F 20-29 (b. 1811-1820) Jane, 2F 5-9 (b. 1831-1835) Aveline & Louisa, 1F 0-4 (b. 1836-1840) Eliza, 1M 0-4 (b. 1836-1840) William], (same township as his father Benjamin and brothers David and Isaac).

    4. [S355] 1850 Franklin Co., IN Census, Ezekiel and half his relatives seem to be missing - I think their neighborhood was missed by the census.

    5. [S1707] Jefferson Co., IN election polls, transcribed by Robert Scott, (noted 15 July 2005), Milton Twp, Jefferson County, Indiana 1837 poll book, 23. Benj Painter, 31. Esekial Painter, and not present in 1836 poll book.

    6. [S1707] Jefferson Co., IN election polls, transcribed by Robert Scott, (noted 15 July 2005), Milton Twp., Jefferson County, Indiana election poll 1840, 78. Ezekial Painter.

    7. [S1754] Letter of William Thomas Painter.

    8. [S2583] 1860 Callaway Co., MO Census, District No. 18, pg. 152/930, 17 August 1860 by John Berry, P.O. WmsBurg, line 19, 1009/1042 E. PAINTER 53 M Farmer 300/200 Pa, Olla 35 F Indianna, William 21 M " [Indianna], David 12 M " [Indianna], Elizabeth 10 F " [Indianna], Isaac 8 M " [Indianna].

    9. [S552] 1870 Montgomery Co., MO Census, Danville Twp., Page No. 54, 25 June 1870 by Benjamin Palmer, P.O. Danville MO, line 4, 364/364 PAINTER Ezekiel 62 MW Farmer 600/550 Pensylvania, Olive 44 FW Keepinghouse Indiana, David 22 MW Laborer Indiana, Elizabeth 20 FW Indiana, Isaac 17 MW school Indiana attended school.

    10. [S1869] Montgomery Co., MO 1883 Pensioners on the Roll, transcribed by Gordon Byers, (noted 15 July 2005), Certificate No. 178,990, PAINTER, Ezekiel, Montgomery City, Cause for which pensioned: father, monthly rate: 8.00, Date of original allowance: Oct. 1877,, To do:, Obtaining Civil War Records:, To obtain Civil War records, use Form 80. You can obtain Form 80's by sending an email request , mailto:inquire@nara.gov, and providing your name and mailing addr.

    11. [S1416] Civil War Pension Index: General Index to Pension Files, 1861-1934, Name of Soldier: PAINTER William C., Name of Dependent: Father PAINTER Ezekiel, E 24 Mo Inf, 1871 July 31 Father 198.073/178.990.

    12. [S2194] 1880 Montgomery Co., MO Census, Page No. 25/48A, S.D. 3, E.D. 109, Danville Township, County of Montgomery, State of Missouri, 17th June 1880 by Jno B Harris, line 44, 209/211 PAINTER Ezeikel WM 73 M Farmer cannot write Penn Penn Penn, Olive WF 55 wife M Keepinghouse Ind Ind Ind, Margarett WF 18 Daught S Keeping house Mo Penn Ind.

    13. [S1777] Lillian Painter Bouck.

    14. [S2509] Personal comment, T. Anderson Painter, Graveyard Plot drawn by Fannie Painter Oliver, 18 April 1946, notes of Wanda Gliser, Ezekiel Painter / Father / 1808 - 1886..

    15. [S1660] Painter Family Cemetery, Danville, Montgomery County, Missouri, Find-a-Grave.

    16. [S2509] Personal comment, T. Anderson Painter, Adams Co., OH marriages, Mi-My, noted 1 November 2004, possible identification of this wife as Catherine Miller: Adams Co., Ohio marriages: MILLER, Catharine to PAINTER, Benjamin Dec 9, 1804 - absolutely NO proof this is the right marriage, but it is alon.

    17. [S1992] Online Marriage Record, Marriages of Campbell, Boone and Kenton Counties, Kentucky, 1795-1850, POINTER, Ezekiel & Jane ROWEN, 24 June 1830, m by William Montague, b Francis Rowan, A-114, Boone Co., KY.

    18. [S1946] Indiana Marriages through 1850, Indiana State Library, PAINTER Ezekiel m. MC CAFFERTY Olly in Franklin [Co.] 5-2-1844.


 
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