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1
http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~txfannin/s222.html
noted 15 Nov 2011
"Malcolm A. McRAE was born in South Carolina May 15, 1810; at the age of four years he was taken by his parents to North Carolina; at ten he went to the Hiawatha purchase, and at twenty went to Georgi, a, in which State he married in 1832, February 22, the widow of John Steward, whose maiden name was Mary Whisenhunt. After fourteen years' residence in Georgia...”

"In the time of raising my family I made three long moves, first fromGeorgia to Southern Missouri. I made one crop and after gathering it Istarted to Texas on the 18th day of November, 1843. I came on foot andwas gone 70 days with my gun and knapsack. I was in Dallas during myfirst trip to Texas. There was but one house between Bonham and Dallas.(71 Miles)
When I got back to Missouri, I rested two weeks, and found that I weighed212 pounds. While I stayed in Newton County, Mo., I found 25 bee trees,killed 60 deer and 69 turkeys, made rails and fenced 40 acres of land andmade two crops. On Nov. 12, 1844, I started back to Georgia, arriving atmy old home on the 8th of January, 1845, having been gone three years andone month." 
McRae, Malcolm A. (I6373)
 
2
Trekcruz78%aol.com
Subject : Search for Marcellus Smith
Date : Sun, 20 Jan 2002 19:54:18 EST

Hello, I am a descendent of Marcellus S. Smith, born 1837 in LaporteCounty,
Indiana. I have copies of his enlistment in the Army at Laclede, Missouriin
1862, as a private in Co. F, 23rd Regt., Missouri Infantry.

Is this the same Marcellus Smith that you have? If so, then I have recent
descendent information. Do you have information about him or his spouse? I
saw your lineage on Marcellus (father George W. Smith, mother Elizabeth
Case); I have information that Marcellus was married to a lady named Jane
Lindsay. I can't find anything about her.

If this is the same Marcellus, I'd be happy to send you copies of the
military documents that I have - there are several pages of pay records,his
enlistment form, etc.

Look forward to hearing from you!

Vanya Scott 
Smith, Marcellus (I6772)
 
3 "1900 census shows Alice as "Liza A." Clifford has her as Alice MalindaCox. Headstone at Mt. Siani has Alice Malinda Cox. Perhpas enumerator wasconfused, same birth date and she is buried near her brother, JamesEdward Cox." - Renaee Marotte

Horton Cox's pension papers also list her as "E.A. Cox". I stronglysuspect she changed her own name from Elizabeth Alice to Alice Malinda. -tap 
Cox, Elizabeth Alice Malinda "Alice" (I4680)
 
4 "A True Story Concerning a Baby Born in Poverty"
by Alice Sarah Brown Wiley

This baby was born on Sept 7, 1893 to Mr and Mrs Alford Brown, who camefrom East Tenn. in Green County. The father and mother were nineteen years old when married. They had a son born to them in one year after mairage, his name was Johnie R Newton, he was born Aug 29, 1880. They lived with Alford Browns grandmother Granny Henery, for a year after their marriage, then they moved to a small place about half mile from Granma Henerys. Lived there until after Alice Sary was born and was a year old then they moved to a place near Anderson Missouri the place was called (Thief Hollow) In those days the country was wild and there were many thieves, People were poor and the men that didnt have jobs would steal from others. This place where they moved was a one roomed log house dubbed with lime. We lived there for a year then moved to another place where there was more farming ground. It was on the banks of Indian creek and mother would go down to the creek or river to wash cloths. By that time Leora Bell Brown was born Dec. 4, 1884. That next summer was where Mother Brown would go down to the river to wash cloths As the water fo rall purposes had to be carried from the river. We had a dog a big Shepard that was bitten by a dog that came to the river where mother and Mrs Rose were washing this dog had rabies and our dog Shep went mad with rabies in three months I believe it was any way in that fall. Stece Munison our neighbor came and shot our beautiful black Shepard dog. Dad thot a lot of him and he wouldnt shoot him. My brother Johnie and I climed up in the barn loft to keep from being bitten by him. We were there playing. Leoraa sister was a baby and she was still wearing long dresses, I (Alice) remembers how she looked. She had long black hair and was a small baby. Mother sometimes would go to the river to wash diapers for Leora and the water was cold.

She took rheumatism and couldnt even lift a skilet or wring a dish cloth. So Mrs. Rose came and helped do the work. One day mother fell and I (Alice) was so scared I tried to lift her up put my hands under her head but of coarse I believe she had to stay there until dad came from the field. Then Mrs Rose came and stayed for a while, I was 3 years old when this happened. Then when I was 5 years old we moved to Mill Creek where we lived until we went from home. Brother Claude Brown now lives at the old home place. It is a beautiful place in the Ozark Hills. The land most of it except about Seventeen acres was to be cleared off before we could have enough land to cultivate. So I was old enough Johnie and I to help with the work. Brother Johnie passed away when he was about eight and a half years old I (Alice) and Johnie were real powels and I had to quite school after he passed away I had no one to walk to school with me and in those days the school children were real mean to the smaller children.This distance to school was one and a half miles by guess. My first teachers name was (Fanny Dean) I loved her very much I did not get to school after Johnie passed away for about three years I was nine years old by that time a new building was put up for a school and it was a one room school house. There was a big heating stove in the middle of the building and we used fuel to heat the building the boys carried wood, our drinking water from a spring near the old Forney place. James LeonardBrown was born Dec 6 1887. He was born before Johnie R Newton passed away, and Johnie used to hold him in his lap while mother worked. William Mathew Brown was born Sept. 10, 1890. He was a fat baby and was subject to colds often croop. He was afraid of mothers brother Newton Pierce because Uncle Nute had a bald head. Now Will has a Bald head like hisuncle Newton Pierce but he is a nice looking man. Claude Oscar McKinley was born Feb 27, 1897, But I have left out where Ethel Elizabeth Brown was born Sept 7, 1893 at the bigining of this story I told where she was born. Im trying to take them in rotation, but have made a mistake. Stella Therisa Brown was born April 19, 1900, Raymond Bert Brown was born on May 26, 1904. Cathrine Ethel Elizabeth Brown was born Sept. 7, 1893 as I said before where we were very poor. Dad was ill for five years we thought he would pass on. He had something wrong with his liver called ager capy ahard not in his liver we had some stock but we could only get two and a half dollars out of a year old calf so that all went for Drs bills. Finally a neighbor told us about a Dr. called Doctor Reason he lived in Noel 6 miles distance. He made 2 or 3 trips buggy and horse travel. He brought 6 or 8 pts of old fashioned cod liver oil and dad took all of it in a couple months he now was able to eat and work a little after five years of suffering. We had a black horse and he was blind and had to eat grass along the fence rows while we ate a cold dinner as we had to rent land and I had to take our dinners but when I was nine years old mother told me to cook their dinners and send them to the field to them by [...]much of a dinner I could put up as we didnt have much to get but we were very thankful for what we had. Mother was a woman of prayer and she thought some day we would have more to live on. All the old timers had ahard time to keep the wolf from their doors. Ethel wasnt a pretty baby but she grew into a beautiful brown eyed long haired girl. She had very few cloths but would stand before the glass and primp until she looked real nice. She was always full of ambition. After she was old enough to work. She was punished for things she shouldnt of been punished for. When mother was pregnant with Ethel Elizabeth she was ill most all the time. A lady by the name of Mrs Diggs that lived a mile from us would come and talk to mother and encourage her. This Lady Mrs Diggs was a ministers wife I believe they had six children the oldest son Bruce became a minister and came back to Mill Creek many years after his folks left there. Where they lived later a family by the name of Correll moved there from Iowa for Mrs Corrells health the Corrells had one son Frank a schoolteacher and two daughters Cora and Pearl that became school teachers I (Alice) went to school with both of them. Pearl lives in Florida now and Cora in Okla. both of their husbands have passed on. Mr. Correll was ourS. School supt. for many years. Where his days were few he would stand and talk to us with tears in his eyes. His was was so much help to mewhen I first became a Christian. I had decided when I was nineteen years old that I wanted to be a christian and serve the Lord. I believe Ethel Elizabeth became a christian when she was fifteen years old. A minister came to Mill Creek to hold a revival and his name was Rev Manning. He preached the old time Salvation and there were about seven of we schoolgirls that went to the revival but I had been converted before that at home out by our old Spring house July 25 about nine o'clock. I had knownfor a year I needed to be saved but God has a time and a place for eachof us. The Lord said to it seemed in a small voice go up higher. I tried to pray where I was but I couldnt and soon as I obeyed the Lord and went up on a place where he told me to go there was the time and God showed me a bright light that lead from earth to heaven then this power of God fell on me and I shouted for joy. I knew the work was done never have I regreted that I made the decision to let God used me to his Glory.

Ethel Elizabeth Brown married when she was seventeend years old. But she cried for week before she married to Will Brown no relation to Ethel but a school mate. She wanted to get an education in Des Moines Iowa but her intended cried and said if she went he would kill hisself so she decided she would marry instead of going to high school. But later she and Willher husband separated. He left her with three little girls Irene was eleven years old so maybe she wouldn't have been called little. She ahd to go to work selling ice cream near where they lived. Ethels husband married a high school girl and oh the tears she shed over him, her pillow wet with tears many times. When I went to visit her thirty eight years ago she met me at the door pale as a corpse. I didnt know Will had left the family when he didnt come home in the evening I said Ethel when does Will get home and she in a low voice said he does not get home at all. Then she had a sick headache she tried to tell me the story why he had left and it ended up in a sick headache. There were the sweet girls three of them, beautiful children. Barbara a baby was really beautiful. A mean woman can do any thing with a man. They dont care just so their wishes are gratified. It broke my heart to see my sister Ethel with three children left and not enought to eat. She had to get out and work scrub wood work at hard work all day long. So she asked God to help her get a job where she could sit down and work so she worked for the Northland Milk co. for fourteen years before she became Credit Manager for some years before she married Dr Guy E Romans a Dentist. Ethel has been very happy sence this marriege and they work together. 
Brown, Alfred Wilkerson "Alf" (I4429)
 
5 "A True Story Concerning a Baby Born in Poverty"
by Alice Sarah Brown Wiley

This baby was born on Sept 7, 1893 to Mr and Mrs Alford Brown, who camefrom East Tenn. in Green County. The father and mother were nineteenyears old when married. They had a son born to them in one year aftermairage, his name was Johnie R Newton, he was born Aug 29, 1880. Theylived with Alford Browns grandmother Granny Henery, for a year aftertheir marriage, then they moved to a small place about half mile fromGranma Henerys. Lived there until after Alice Sary was born and was ayear old then they moved to a place near Anderson Missouri the place wascalled (Thief Hollow) In those days the country was wild and there weremany thieves, People were poor and the men that didnt have jobs wouldsteal from others. This place where they moved was a one roomed log housedubbed with lime. We lived there for a year then moved to another placewhere there was more farming ground. It was on the banks of Indian creekand mother would go down to the creek or river to wash cloths. By thattime Leora Bell Brown was born Dec. 4, 1884. That next summer was whereMother Brown would go down to the river to wash cloths As the water forall purposes had to be carried from the river. We had a dog a big Shepardthat was bitten by a dog that came to the river where mother and Mrs Rosewere washing this dog had rabies and our dog Shep went mad with rabies inthree months I believe it was any way in that fall. Stece Munison ourneighbor came and shot our beautiful black Shepard dog. Dad thot a lot ofhim and he wouldnt shoot him. My brother Johnie and I climed up in thebarn loft to keep from being bitten by him. We were there playing. Leoraa sister was a baby and she was still wearing long dresses, I (Alice)remembers how she looked. She had long black hair and was a small baby.Mother sometimes would go to the river to wash diapers for Leora and thewater was cold.

She took rheumatism and couldnt even lift a skilet or wring a dish cloth.So Mrs. Rose came and helped do the work. One day mother fell and I(Alice) was so scared I tried to lift her up put my hands under her headbut of coarse I believe she had to stay there until dad came from thefield. Then Mrs Rose came and stayed for a while, I was 3 years old whenthis happened. Then when I was 5 years old we moved to Mill Creek wherewe lived until we went from home. Brother Claude Brown now lives at theold home place. It is a beautiful place in the Ozark Hills. The land mostof it except about Seventeen acres was to be cleared off before we couldhave enough land to cultivate. So I was old enough Johnie and I to helpwith the work. Brother Johnie passed away when he was about eight and ahalf years old I (Alice) and Johnie were real powels and I had to quiteschool after he passed away I had no one to walk to school with me and inthose days the school children were real mean to the smaller children.This distance to school was one and a half miles by guess. My firstteachers name was (Fanny Dean) I loved her very much I did not get toschool after Johnie passed away for about three years I was nine yearsold by that time a new building was put up for a school and it was a oneroom school house. There was a big heating stove in the middle of thebuilding and we used fuel to heat the building the boys carried wood, ourdrinking water from a spring near the old Forney place. James LeonardBrown was born Dec 6 1887. He was born before Johnie R Newton passed away, and Johnie used to hold him in his lap while mother worked. WilliamMathew Brown was born Sept. 10, 1890. He was a fat baby and was subjectto colds often croop. He was afraid of mothers brother Newton Piercebecause Uncle Nute had a bald head. Now Will has a Bald head like hisuncle Newton Pierce but he is a nice looking man. Claude Oscar McKinleywas born Feb 27, 1897, But I have left out where Ethel Elizabeth Brownwas born Sept 7, 1893 at the bigining of this story I told where she wasborn. Im trying to take them in rotation, but have made a mistake. StellaTherisa Brown was born April 19, 1900, Raymond Bert Brown was born on May26, 1904. Cathrine Ethel Elizabeth Brown was born Sept. 7, 1893 as I saidbefore where we were very poor. Dad was ill for five years we thought hewould pass on. He had something wrong with his liver calledager capy ahard not in his liver we had some stock but we could only get two and ahalf dollars out of a year old calf so that all went for Drs bills.Finally a neighbor told us about a Dr. called Doctor Reason he lived inNoel 6 miles distance. He made 2 or 3 trips buggy and horse travel. Hebrought 6 or 8 pts of old fashioned cod liver oil and dad took all of itin a couple months he now was able to eat and work a little after fiveyears of suffering. We had a black horse and he was blind and had to eatgrass along the fence rows while we ate a cold dinner as we had to rentland and I had to take our dinners but when I was nine years old mothertold me to cook their dinners and send them to the field to them by [...]much of a dinner I could put up as we didnt have much to get but we werevery thankful for what we had. Mother was a woman of prayer and shethought some day we would have more to live on. All the old timers had ahard time to keep the wolf from their doors. Ethel wasnt a pretty babybut she grew into a beautiful brown eyed long haired girl. She had veryfew cloths but would stand before the glass and primp until she lookedreal nice. She was always full of ambition. After she was old enough towork. She was punished for things she shouldnt of been punished for. Whenmother was pregnant with Ethel Elizabeth she was ill most all the time. Alady by the name of Mrs Diggs that lived a mile from us would come andtalk to mother and encourage her. This Lady Mrs Diggs was a ministerswife I believe they had six children the oldest son Bruce became aminister and came back to Mill Creek many years after his folks leftthere. Where they lived later a family by the name of Correll moved therefrom Iowa for Mrs Corrells health the Corrells had one son Frank a schoolteacher and two daughters Cora and Pearl that became school teachers I(Alice) went to school with both of them. Pearl lives in Florida now andCora in Okla. both of their husbands have passed on. Mr. Correll was ourS. School supt. for many years. Where his days were few he would standand talk to us with tears in his eyes. His was was so much help to mewhen I first became a Christian. I had decided when I was nineteen yearsold that I wanted to be a christian and serve the Lord. I believe EthelElizabeth became a christian when she was fifteen years old. A ministercame to Mill Creek to hold a revival and his name was Rev Manning. Hepreached the old time Salvation and there were about seven of we schoolgirls that went to the revival but I had been converted before that athome out by our old Spring house July 25 about nine o'clock. I had knownfor a year I needed to be saved but God has a time and a place for eachof us. The Lord said to it seemed in a small voice go up higher. I triedto pray where I was but I couldnt and soon as I obeyed the Lord and wentup on a place where he told me to go there was the time and God showed mea bright light that lead from earth to heaven then this power of God fellon me and I shouted for joy. I knew the work was done never have Iregreted that I made the decision to let God used me to his Glory.

Ethel Elizabeth Brown married when she was seventeend years old. But shecried for week before she married to Will Brown no relation to Ethel buta school mate. She wanted to get an education in Des Moines Iowa but herintended cried and said if she went he would kill hisself so she decidedshe would marry instead of going to high school. But later she and Willher husband separated. He left her with three little girls Irene waseleven years old so maybe she wouldn't have been called little. She ahdto go to work selling ice cream near where they lived. Ethels husbandmarried a high school girl and oh the tears she shed over him, her pillowwet with tears many times. When I went to visit her thirty eight yearsago she met me at the door pale as a corpse. I didnt know Will had leftthe family when he didnt come home in the evening I said Ethel when doesWill get home and she in a low voice said he does not get home at all.Then she had a sick headache she tried to tell me the story why he hadleft and it ended up in a sick headache. There were the sweet girls threeof them, beautiful children. Barbara a baby was really beautiful. A meanwoman can do any thing with a man. They dont care just so their wishesare gratified. It broke my heart to see my sister Ethel with threechildren left and not enought to eat. She had to get out and work scrubwood work at hard work all day long. So she asked God to help her get ajob where she could sit down and work so she worked for the NorthlandMilk co. for fourteen years before she became Credit Manager for someyears before she married Dr Guy E Romans a Dentist. Ethel has been veryhappy sence this marriege and they work together. 
Brown, Sarah Alice "Alice" (I4432)
 
6 "A True Story Concerning a Baby Born in Poverty"
by Alice Sarah Brown Wiley

This baby was born on Sept 7, 1893 to Mr and Mrs Alford Brown, who camefrom East Tenn. in Green County. The father and mother were nineteenyears old when married. They had a son born to them in one year aftermairage, his name was Johnie R Newton, he was born Aug 29, 1880. Theylived with Alford Browns grandmother Granny Henery, for a year aftertheir marriage, then they moved to a small place about half mile fromGranma Henerys. Lived there until after Alice Sary was born and was ayear old then they moved to a place near Anderson Missouri the place wascalled (Thief Hollow) In those days the country was wild and there weremany thieves, People were poor and the men that didnt have jobs wouldsteal from others. This place where they moved was a one roomed log housedubbed with lime. We lived there for a year then moved to another placewhere there was more farming ground. It was on the banks of Indian creekand mother would go down to the creek or river to wash cloths. By thattime Leora Bell Brown was born Dec. 4, 1884. That next summer was whereMother Brown would go down to the river to wash cloths As the water forall purposes had to be carried from the river. We had a dog a big Shepardthat was bitten by a dog that came to the river where mother and Mrs Rosewere washing this dog had rabies and our dog Shep went mad with rabies inthree months I believe it was any way in that fall. Stece Munison ourneighbor came and shot our beautiful black Shepard dog. Dad thot a lot ofhim and he wouldnt shoot him. My brother Johnie and I climed up in thebarn loft to keep from being bitten by him. We were there playing. Leoraa sister was a baby and she was still wearing long dresses, I (Alice)remembers how she looked. She had long black hair and was a small baby.Mother sometimes would go to the river to wash diapers for Leora and thewater was cold.

She took rheumatism and couldnt even lift a skilet or wring a dish cloth.So Mrs. Rose came and helped do the work. One day mother fell and I(Alice) was so scared I tried to lift her up put my hands under her headbut of coarse I believe she had to stay there until dad came from thefield. Then Mrs Rose came and stayed for a while, I was 3 years old whenthis happened. Then when I was 5 years old we moved to Mill Creek wherewe lived until we went from home. Brother Claude Brown now lives at theold home place. It is a beautiful place in the Ozark Hills. The land mostof it except about Seventeen acres was to be cleared off before we couldhave enough land to cultivate. So I was old enough Johnie and I to helpwith the work. Brother Johnie passed away when he was about eight and ahalf years old I (Alice) and Johnie were real powels and I had to quiteschool after he passed away I had no one to walk to school with me and inthose days the school children were real mean to the smaller children.This distance to school was one and a half miles by guess. My firstteachers name was (Fanny Dean) I loved her very much I did not get toschool after Johnie passed away for about three years I was nine yearsold by that time a new building was put up for a school and it was a oneroom school house. There was a big heating stove in the middle of thebuilding and we used fuel to heat the building the boys carried wood, ourdrinking water from a spring near the old Forney place. James LeonardBrown was born Dec 6 1887. He was born before Johnie R Newton passed away, and Johnie used to hold him in his lap while mother worked. WilliamMathew Brown was born Sept. 10, 1890. He was a fat baby and was subjectto colds often croop. He was afraid of mothers brother Newton Piercebecause Uncle Nute had a bald head. Now Will has a Bald head like hisuncle Newton Pierce but he is a nice looking man. Claude Oscar McKinleywas born Feb 27, 1897, But I have left out where Ethel Elizabeth Brownwas born Sept 7, 1893 at the bigining of this story I told where she wasborn. Im trying to take them in rotation, but have made a mistake. StellaTherisa Brown was born April 19, 1900, Raymond Bert Brown was born on May26, 1904. Cathrine Ethel Elizabeth Brown was born Sept. 7, 1893 as I saidbefore where we were very poor. Dad was ill for five years we thought hewould pass on. He had something wrong with his liver calledager capy ahard not in his liver we had some stock but we could only get two and ahalf dollars out of a year old calf so that all went for Drs bills.Finally a neighbor told us about a Dr. called Doctor Reason he lived inNoel 6 miles distance. He made 2 or 3 trips buggy and horse travel. Hebrought 6 or 8 pts of old fashioned cod liver oil and dad took all of itin a couple months he now was able to eat and work a little after fiveyears of suffering. We had a black horse and he was blind and had to eatgrass along the fence rows while we ate a cold dinner as we had to rentland and I had to take our dinners but when I was nine years old mothertold me to cook their dinners and send them to the field to them by [...]much of a dinner I could put up as we didnt have much to get but we werevery thankful for what we had. Mother was a woman of prayer and shethought some day we would have more to live on. All the old timers had ahard time to keep the wolf from their doors. Ethel wasnt a pretty babybut she grew into a beautiful brown eyed long haired girl. She had veryfew cloths but would stand before the glass and primp until she lookedreal nice. She was always full of ambition. After she was old enough towork. She was punished for things she shouldnt of been punished for. Whenmother was pregnant with Ethel Elizabeth she was ill most all the time. Alady by the name of Mrs Diggs that lived a mile from us would come andtalk to mother and encourage her. This Lady Mrs Diggs was a ministerswife I believe they had six children the oldest son Bruce became aminister and came back to Mill Creek many years after his folks leftthere. Where they lived later a family by the name of Correll moved therefrom Iowa for Mrs Corrells health the Corrells had one son Frank a schoolteacher and two daughters Cora and Pearl that became school teachers I(Alice) went to school with both of them. Pearl lives in Florida now andCora in Okla. both of their husbands have passed on. Mr. Correll was ourS. School supt. for many years. Where his days were few he would standand talk to us with tears in his eyes. His was was so much help to mewhen I first became a Christian. I had decided when I was nineteen yearsold that I wanted to be a christian and serve the Lord. I believe EthelElizabeth became a christian when she was fifteen years old. A ministercame to Mill Creek to hold a revival and his name was Rev Manning. Hepreached the old time Salvation and there were about seven of we schoolgirls that went to the revival but I had been converted before that athome out by our old Spring house July 25 about nine o'clock. I had knownfor a year I needed to be saved but God has a time and a place for eachof us. The Lord said to it seemed in a small voice go up higher. I triedto pray where I was but I couldnt and soon as I obeyed the Lord and wentup on a place where he told me to go there was the time and God showed mea bright light that lead from earth to heaven then this power of God fellon me and I shouted for joy. I knew the work was done never have Iregreted that I made the decision to let God used me to his Glory.

Ethel Elizabeth Brown married when she was seventeend years old. But shecried for week before she married to Will Brown no relation to Ethel buta school mate. She wanted to get an education in Des Moines Iowa but herintended cried and said if she went he would kill hisself so she decidedshe would marry instead of going to high school. But later she and Willher husband separated. He left her with three little girls Irene waseleven years old so maybe she wouldn't have been called little. She ahdto go to work selling ice cream near where they lived. Ethels husbandmarried a high school girl and oh the tears she shed over him, her pillowwet with tears many times. When I went to visit her thirty eight yearsago she met me at the door pale as a corpse. I didnt know Will had leftthe family when he didnt come home in the evening I said Ethel when doesWill get home and she in a low voice said he does not get home at all.Then she had a sick headache she tried to tell me the story why he hadleft and it ended up in a sick headache. There were the sweet girls threeof them, beautiful children. Barbara a baby was really beautiful. A meanwoman can do any thing with a man. They dont care just so their wishesare gratified. It broke my heart to see my sister Ethel with threechildren left and not enought to eat. She had to get out and work scrubwood work at hard work all day long. So she asked God to help her get ajob where she could sit down and work so she worked for the NorthlandMilk co. for fourteen years before she became Credit Manager for someyears before she married Dr Guy E Romans a Dentist. Ethel has been veryhappy sence this marriege and they work together. 
Brown, Catherine Ethel Elizabeth "Ethel" (I4435)
 
7 "ALEXANDER WITHERSPOON was born circa 1750. He was listed on the roll ofthe Fourth Creek Presbyterian Church in 1773 in Iredell Co., NorthCarolina. He was listed in the tax list of Capt. Purviance in 1778 inIredell District, Rowan Co., North Carolina. In 1783 in Rowan Co., NorthCarolina, William Luckie to Alexander Witherspoon, land on S. Fork of S.Yadkin River. On 1 Jul 1784 Morgan District, Rowan Co., North Carolina,Alexander Witherspoon entered a claim for nine pounds, two shillings, forRevolutionary War militia service. He died on 1 Nov 1818 in WilsonCounty, Tennessee." -LBLawhon Witherspoon, Alexander (I6561)
 
8 "Belle married a Mr. Green from Fulton, Ky. (His family raised race horses). They came to near Lamar, [Barton Co.) Mo. She died in child birth. Mr. Green took the baby girl and went back to Kentucky."
-Jessie Mae Jackson 
Jackson, Lucy M. Arabella R. B. "Belle" (I6503)
 
9 "Big Bill Painter was soon known for miles around as the strongest man among the settlers. He could life a bigger log than any other; also out-run, out-swim, out-wrestle, out-jump, any other man that could be found. He was best with an ax or at most any manual labor.

"At log rollings, house raising, clearings, and other gatherings andcontests, no one could be found who could out do Bill Painter,and he was quiet and modest, very kind and helpful to others. Very bashful among ladies, and often took his axe or gun and went into the forest when young ladies would come to the Painter home on visits. He had a very meager education, and never thought of trying to make money by exhibiting his great strength. He had no desire for publicity or professional honors. He enjoyed being with his folks and friends that he had known all hislife. Thoughts of highly refined society, travel and wealth were not for him. He would gladly perform feats when those who were near and dear to him would request him to do so, as no man could be found who could throw him in a wrestle. They would gang up on him and yet he just laughed at them. He could lay flat on his back on the ground and outstretched arms and legs and just submit to their grasping any desired hold on him, and as many as could get close enough to hold on, and when they would announce they had him down and were sure they could hold him, he could roll them around as though they were just little children. He was ever careful to not seriously injure any one. But he would be up on his feet, laughing at them in a few seconds.

"But our hero joined the Union Army and went south to fight for the Union. He was quiet and reserved among the soldiers and few of his comrades knew of his super strength. He was wounded once and went back home on a short furlough, and then returned to his regiment and gave his life for the Union cause, and was buried near Memphis, Tennessee."

-William Thomas Painter

Painter, William Union Infantry 24th Regiment, Missouri Infantry - were near Memphis Sept. 1863

Civil War Pension Index: General Index to Pension Files, 1861-1934,ancestry.com
Name of Soldier: PAINTER William C.
Name of Dependent: Father PAINTER Ezekiel
e 24 Mo Inf
1871 July 31 Father 198.073/178.990 
Painter, William C. (I1291)
 
10 "Dorinda Lacy" appointed administrator of Blewford's will Lacy, Bluford (I6264)
 
11 "Evidence points to RACHEL GRUBB as being the mother of Thornton and Joseph. She is the "other woman" in Chloe's divorce decree. William buys land from Rachel in 1806 located in Washington Co.,TN. Rachel lived in Greene Co.,TN. at the time." - Renaee Marotte

Greene County, TN 1840 census
GRUBS 52-59-64

Greene Cty, TN Tax List Taxables of Captain Morriss' Company for the year1797
Land White Polls Black Polls Stud Horse TownLots
Edwin Grubs 52 1 0 0 0
Greene County, TN Taxables of Captain Dodd's Company for the year 1800
Edward Grubs 50

http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~hendrycousins/land/landdeed1806.htm
Renaee Marotte, noted 19 April 2001
Know all men by these presents that I RACHEL GRUBB of Greene County andstate of Tennessee in consideration of the sum of One hundred dollarslawful money paid to me by WILLIAM HENDRY of the county and stateaforesaid the receipt whereof I Rachel Grubb do hereby acknowledge dohereby give grant bargain and sell and convey unto said William Hendryhis heirs and assigns forever a certain tract or parcel of land situate a(sic) follows, to wit beginning at a white oak JAMES (ALSUPS) line thenceon said line north seventy (sic) degrees east one hundred and forty polesto a red oak in HENRY LONGS line then said line east thrith seven polesto a buckeye on Reedy Branch thence thirty eight poles to a white oakthence a straight line to the begining containing forty five acres tohave and to hold the said granted and bargained premises with thepriviledges and appurtenences thereof to him the said William Hendry hisheirs and assigns forever to his and their use benefit and behoof (sic)forever and I the said Rachel Grubb for myself my heirs exectutors andadministrators do covenant with the said William Hendry his heirs andassigns that I am lawfully seized in fee of the premises hereby grantedand that they are free of all incumberances (sic) whatsoever that I havegood right to sell and convey the same to the said William Hendry that asaforesaid and that I will warrant and defend the same to the said WilliamHendry his heirs and assigns forever against the lawful claims and demandof all persons whatsoever in testimony whereof I have hereunto set myhand and affixed my seal this (rubbed out) day of August one thousandeight hundred and six [1806]
signed, sealed and delivered in presents of
JOHN ROSE (x)
RACHEL GRUBB (x) her mark

JOHN BEALES (x) his mark WILLIAM GRUBB (x) his mark

1806 Then the within deed was proven in open court and recorded let it beregister. (?) JAMES SEVIER, Clerk (sic)


State of Tennessee, Washington County January 6th, 1807 then was theforegoing deed registered in this office with certificates by


JOHN ADAMS, Register

Sell to David Brown-1806 
Grubb, Rachel (I4651)
 
12 "Grandfather had very red hair - wore a fuzzy beard from his temples [down under his chin and kept his upper lip and chin clean shaven]...They were in some kind of business - hardware store I believe." Sylvia Taylor Painter, WEAKLY YARNAL, Jan. 22, 1962.

Hayden and Mary Jane Boston Taylor Bible Record
transcribed 17 October 2005 by T. Anderson Painter

Hayden Taylor son of John and Nancy Taylor born
Hart Co Kentucky Feb. 8 1822
Mary Jane Boston Daughter of James + Biddy Boston was
born Green County Kentucky Jan 1829

BIRTHS

Hayden Taylor + Mary Jane Boston
were married at the home of her Fathers
by the Revd W.C. Privets? Feby 12 1851

Hayden Taylor born hart Co Ky Feb 8 1822
Mary Jane Taylor born green Co. Ky Jan 18 1829
James Washington Taylor born hart Co Ky Jn 27 1851
ransom Lane Taylor born hiart Co. Ky Dec 18. 1852
William Adair Taylor born heart Co Ky Feb 2, 1854
George Alexander Taylor born heart Co Ky April 5, 1855
Elvira May Taylor born heart Co. Ky Oct 14, 1856
John Franklin Taylor born pulaski Co mo March 1 1858
Benjamin smith Taylor born pulaski Co mo nov 16 1859
Zacariah harrison Taylor born pulaski Co mo Feb 14, 1861
Martha francis Taylor born pulaski Co mo Jan 23 1863
Mary Jane Taylor born pulaski Co mo Feb 4 1865
Hayden Jackson Taylor born pulaski Co mo Jan 24 1867
Willis Randall Taylor pulaksi Co mo Nov 22 1870


* * * * *

Ruth Collins McQuerry, (noted 6 September 2004), Tombstone Inscriptions throughout Pulaski County, Missouri, Vol. II, published by the Pulaski County Historical Society and Museum 1985. Mitschele Cemetery:
Hayden, Taylor, 8 Feb. 1822; 10 Sep 1887
[note of R. McQuerry, "This is exactly as it is written in the book."


http://ftp.rootsweb.com/pub/usgenweb/ky/green/vitals/marr/marrbka.txt
TAYLOR, James to McMURRY, Sally, cons her par, James & Peggy, 11 Feb 1813.
TAYLOR, Matthew to HARDING, Prudence, cons her f, Stephen, Feb 1801
(bond 20 --- 1801.
HARDING, Asa to TAYLOR, ELizabeth 29 Jan 1813.
HARDING, John to TAYLOR, Susannah, cons her father, Samuel,Feb 1801 (bond
taken 2 Feb).
BERRY, Samuel to TAYLOR, Eleanor, 1813.
HOGAN, James to TAYLOR, Mabel, 27 Apr 1817.
RUTHERFORD, John to TAYLOR, Prudence, 7 Oct 1804.
WHITE, Andrew to DUVALL, Rachel, cons John McNeer & Mathew Taylor, 1802,
bond date, 6? Apr 1802
WHITE, Wm P. to TAYLOR, Judy, cons her f, John Y., 29 Jul 1812
ROBINSON, Beverly to TAYLOR, Sarah E., cons by step-father, JohnRutherford,
doesn't say whose, 11 Jul 1820

From : Ruth and Wayne McQuerry
Sent : Tuesday, September 7, 2004 5:29 PM
To : Tara Painter
Subject : Directions

Here are the locations of the cemeteries I mentioned.

Mitschele Cemetery, Pulaski County, Missouri
On Highway 7 behind the Old Henry Bailey Farm. West one mile fromGasconade
River, on Raymond York property. About 13 unmarked. (1985)


Clark Cemetery, Pulaski County, Missouri (1981)
Located on Fort Leonard Wood, Missouri.

You would probably will have to check in with the guard at Fort LeonardWood. We
had a cemetery that is now located on a military base in VermillionCounty,
Indiana. We had no problem getting permission to see the cemetery. Theyprovided
an armed guard to guide us and stayed with us all the time we were there.We
could
take all the pictures we wanted at the cemetery, but could not takepictures of
anything else. You may run into a similar situation at Fort Leonard Wood.I
think
it would be fun to try. It is a good thing we had a guide as we wouldnever have
found it on our own.

I have a copy of the plot layout but do not have a scanner to send it.
From the layout, it looks as if the cemetery runs pretty much north andsouth.
In
the uppermost (north) left corner are plots 1, 2, & 3. This appears to bewhere
the three Taylor children are buried. Grave # 4 is unknown.

I would appreciate knowing if you do get to these cemeteries. It is sortof
exciting to locate those graves and know that is where your ancestors are
buried.
And to know the area where they once lived.

Good Luck!

Ruth 
Taylor, Hayden (I11726)
 
13 "Grandfather Hudson fought in an Ind. Regiment (He was a Teamster), drove 4 mules for comisary all through Civil War. Died 1887 - 60 years of agewas 6 ft. 6 in. high wore 14 shoe, lankey and strong, liked to playcards, worked hard. Lottie has a letter he wrote home in Nov. 1863 just before battle of Look-out Mountain. Grandma saved it."

- Wm. T. "Uncle Bill" Painter

Transcript of letter written by George Hudson during Civil War to his wife (original said to have been in possession of Charlotte Painter Stollard.)

Bridgeport, Ala. in 12 mi. of Chattanooga. In sight of Lookout Mt. The Rebs hold one half of this mtn. Rosecrans on one side and Bragg theother.

Dear Wife - the last time that I wrote to you was at Florence in this State. We have been on a long fatiguing march, over the Cumberland Mtns.and the Smoky Mtns. in Tenn. Chattanooga is in Ga. They have hard times marching this last month carrying our knapsacks and we have been on half rations. We have marched over 1000 miles in the last 6 wks. but I won'tcomplain just so I live. We are going to march tomorrow. Our Brigade goes in first tomorrow. We have got to a place where it is death or victory. We stopped here last night (Sunday night) to rest a little and turned over our tents and wagons and horses and everything that is heavy so we can get along better. Everything is in such a hurry today.

You must not think it strange if I don't write much - I just now got a letter from you that had the print of Sampeys and Rosies and Wills hands. They looked pretty to me. I also got a letter from Mother at the same time that said she was 70 years old on the 12th of last Sept. I will not have time to answer her letter, you can tell her. Your letter did not say anything about the twenty dollars that I sent you by Mr. Hill of Raysville, Ind.

Well, Nellie, you told me about your dream. Dreams are very pleasant tome at times. I can say that I am well and thankful to God for it. I want you to be in good heart till I come home. There is no chance for furloughs till after this Lookout Mtn. battle. Make yourselves ascomfortable as you can. You know that I have got myself in a fix that I can't come to your relief when I please. (Look on the other sheet.) You know that three yrs. won't last always. I don't think the war will end enyway soon the way things is going on. I want you to stay where you are, let what will come. Everthing will work out right after while.

I have two nice rings for you that cost three dollars apiece. I wear them on each little finger. They are set with silver and pearl sets. I am afraid to risk sending them in a letter for fear you don't get them.
Now I must tell you how I look. I have not shaved for one year. The hair on my upper lip is as long as a goats. I know the children would not know me if I was to come home this way.

[Last part of letter lost.]



* * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

From Binford, J.H., History of Hancock County, Indiana, Greenfield, IN: King and Binford, 1882, page 123, Buck-Creek Township, Murder -- Here occurred the Kennedy tragedy, in which Thomas Kennedy killed his own daughter, the wife of George Hudson, for which he was sentenced to the penetentiary for life; but was in the course of a few years, through the intercession of his attorney, T.D. Walpole, pardoned after which he returned to his own neighborhood, where he remained till his death, which occurred only a few years since. Sarah Kennedy and George Hudson had one son, James Riley, who was about 15 months old at the time of the murder.


1860 Hancock Co., IN Census, Page No. 14
Green Township, County of Hancock, State of Indiana
6th June 1860 by Elijah L. Cooper
P.O. Eden
line 26, 112/111 George HUDSON 32 M Farm Labour /200 Indiana
Eleanar 25 F "[Indiana] cannot r/w
Jane 11 F "[Indiana]
Mary Ellin 6 f "[Indiana]
George W 3 M "[Indiana]
Rosannah 1 f "[Indiana].

1870 Hancock Co., IN Census, Center Twp., Page No. 28/345B, 21 July 1870 by Lee O. Harris, P.O. Greenfield Ind, line 20, 205/209 HUDSON George 42 MW Farmer /325 Indiana, Ellender 36 FW Keepinghouse Indiana cannot write, James R 21 MW works on farm Indiana, Mary E 16 FW Indiana attended school, George W 15 MW Indiana attended school, Rosina 11 FW Indiana attended school, Sampson 8 MW Indiana attended school, Madison M 2 MW Indiana.

1880 Montgomery Co., MO Census, State Missouri
County Montgomery
Lower Loutre Township, Page No. 49/90A, S.D. 3, E.D. 110, 3rd + 6 June 1880 by Geo. R Wright,
line 10, 409/442 HUDSON Geo WM 52 Husband M Tiemaker Ind Ky Va,
Elander WF 46 wife M housekeeper " [Ind] Ky NCarolina,
Samson WM 18 Son S work at house " [Ind] Ind Ind,
Monroe WM 12 Son S --- [work at house] " [Ind] -- [Ind] -- [Ind],
Sarah WF 8 Daughter S asst housekeeper " [Ind] -- [Ind] -- [Ind],
HAUGH Joseph WM 85 hired hand S Laborer Ind Ind Ind,
line 16, 410/443 SMITH O.P. WM 32 husband M Tiemaker " [Ind] Ohio Ohio, Rosanna WF 21 wife M housekeeper Ind Ind Ind, George WM 4 Son S work at house Ind " [Ind] " [Ind], Andrew WM 1 Son S Mo " [Ind] " [Ind].


Oren Perry, Adjutant General, Indiana in the Mexican War, (Indianapolis, 1 Aug 1908), Indiana Soldiers 4th Regiment Indiana Volunteer Infantry, Mexican War, Company D, noted 20 August 2004, Source for these records are Indiana in the Mexican War, by Oran Perry, Adjutant General, Indianapolis, 1 Aug 1908. This Company consisted mostly of soldiers from Marion County, Indiana, called the Marion County Infantry. Captain, Edward Landers, Marion County. Mustered in 28 May 1847, at Jeffersonville, Indiana, by Captain Gatlin, mustered out 16 Jul 1848, at Madison, Indiana, by Major H. A. Goff. 1st Lieutenant, Abraham B. B. Lewis, Marion County. Mustered in 28 May 1847, at Jeffersonville, Indiana, by Captain Gatlin, mustered out 16 Jul 1848, at Madison, Indiana, by Major H. A. Goff.
Private, George HUDSON, Marion County. Mustered in 28 May 1847, at Jeffersonville, Indiana, by Captain Gatlin, deserted 25 Jun 1847. 
Hudson, George W. (I1859)
 
14 "Had 2 children that died, buried in Sangamon County with Grandfather Molohon" Clayton, Della Mae (I2873)
 
15 "He was the absolute classic hillbilly...his boys were too. They were good kings. He was 6 foot 4, long, lean..." - Bill Painter, Sr.

Raised registered Jersey cows.

www.rootweb.com

James A. RAYL

Born: 1863 in Pulaski Co., Mo
Father: James E. RAYL
Mother: Mary A.
Wife's Name
Mary E.
Born: Abt. 1863 Place: <, Pulaski, Mo>

1. Sex M
Virgil C. RAYL
Born: Jan 1885 in Pulaski Co., Mo
2. Sex F
Sarah F. RAYL
Born: May 1887 in Pulaski Co., Mo
3. Sex F
Cora B. RAYL
Born: Dec 1890 in Pulaski Co., Mo

http://www.rootsweb.com/~mopulask/1870-2.txt
CENSUS YR: 1870 STATE or TERRITORY: MO COUNTY: Pulaski DIVISION:Cullen Township REEL NO: M593-801 PAGE NO: 174a
REFERENCE: Cullen Township on August 8, 1870 by Allen Hamer
1 55 56 Rayl Jesse A. 57 M W Farmer 10,0008,000 Tennessee X . P.O. Waynesville -handwritten page #9
2 55 56 Rayl Sarah J. 52 F W Keeping House. . Tennessee
3 55 56 Rayl Harriett 18 F W House Keeper. . Missouri X
4 55 56 Rayl George W. 12 M W At School .. Missouri X
5 55 56 Rayl Charles R. 8 M W Missouri X..
6 55 56 Rayl Mary S. 9 F W Missouri .X X . . . .
7 55 56 Underwood Rebecca 22 F W House Keeper. . Tennessee

8 56 57 Rayl William 29 M W VD G. Merchant4,000 3,000 Missouri X
9 56 57 Rayl Caroline 25 F W Keeping House. . Missouri
10 56 57 Rayl Cora 2 F W . Missouri XX
11 57 58 Rayl Jesse A. 24 M W D. G. Merchant. 600 Missouri X
12 57 58 Rayl Laura C. 18 F W Keeping House. Missouri

35 61 62 Rayl Henry 55 M B Farm Laborer100 Virginia X X X
36 61 62 Rayl Violet 35 F B Keeping HouseKentucky . X X
37 61 62 Rayl Newton 16 M M Farm LaborerMissouri X X
38 61 62 Rayl Mary Jane 14 F M Missouri XX
39 61 62 Rayl Jenk 10 M M Missouri XX
40 61 62 Rayl Joseph 2 M M Missouri XX

12 126 127 Rayl Octavis 30 M W Farmer 2,000400 Missouri X
13 126 127 Rayl Nancy 26 F W Missouri
http://www.rootsweb.com/~mopulask/1870-6.txt
13 41 41 Rayl Elbert 33 M W Farmer 1,5001,200 Tennessee X
14 41 41 Rayl Mary 27 F W Keeping HouseMissouri X X
15 41 41 Rayl Mary S. 10 F W Missouri X
16 41 41 Rayl James A. 7 M W Missouri
17 41 41 Rayl Charles 1 M W Missouri 
Rayl, Charlie Virgil (I11871)
 
16 "her bro. Jno present" Family F3685
 
17 "in and for said county Personally appeared
Nancy Cox widow of Horton Cox
and makes oath that this only explenation
she can give in regard to the discrepency
in the name of her Second child named
in her decleration for pension is she
is no schollar herself, and did not
know how the name of sd child was
written wither in the original decleration
or Suppemental affidavit she first
gave the name of sd child to the person
who made out her decleration did
not know how he spelt it,
and when her Supplemental affidavit
was made up she handed the person
who made it up her family Record
and from that the names of the children
was taken, and on now being called
on for this explination she has the name
cearfully examined, and find it Spelt
Manday which is the way the father
of said child did Spell it as he did
write the names in the family Record
the affiant further swers" 
Cox, Amanda C. "Manday" (I2918)
 
18 "LANE, GEORGE." The Handbook of Texas Online.[Accessed Wed Oct 2 1:10:32 US/Central 2002 ].

LANE, GEORGE (1813-1885). George Lane, jurist and public servant, wasborn in Ireland on February 16, 1813, the son of William and Olivia Laneand brother of Walter Paye Lane.qv The family sailed to America in 1821,landed in Baltimore, Maryland, and moved on to Ohio, where the childrenwere reared. George studied law and attended Transylvania University,where he graduated in 1837. He moved to Sabine County, Texas, in thewinter of 1837 and was admitted to the Texas bar in 1838. He volunteeredfor service at the time of the Vicente CÛrdovaqv uprising and wasdistrict attorney of the First District when thirty-one Mexicans of theNacogdoches area were prosecuted for treason. Sam Houston'sqv appointmentof Lane as district attorney at San Augustine in November 1838 was notconfirmed, but when Houston became president for a second term, heappointed Lane notary public for Panola County (1842). In the 1840s Lanemoved to Marshall, where he was associated in law practice with Isaac VanZandt.qv He helped organize Trinity Episcopal Church in Marshall in 1850.

Lane served as chief justice of the commissioners' court of HarrisonCounty from 1860 to 1865. He was a member of a committee of prominentHarrison County men that advocated secessionqv in November 1860, and hesupported the Confederate cause through the war. After the war he was asupporter of the Citizen's party of Harrison County,qv which sought toreturn the county to white control. Richard B. Cokeqv appointed himdistrict judge of the Fifth District in 1874. Lane ran for the office ofcounty judge on the Citizen's party ticket in 1878, in an election markedby fraudulent returns and the intimidation of black voters. The electionresults were contested in the district court and the Texas Supreme Court,where Lane's case served as a test case for all the officers elected inthe county. The decision in his favor marked the victory of"redemptionist" forces in Harrison County.

Lane married Joanna Curlin in 1841, and they had eleven children. Hebelonged to the Episcopal and the Methodist churches at different times.He died on February 28, 1885, and was buried in the old Marshall Cemetery.

BIBLIOGRAPHY: Randolph B. Campbell, A Southern Community in Crisis:Harrison County, Texas, 1850-1880 (Austin: Texas State HistoricalAssociation, 1983). Clarksville Northern Standard, July 23, 1959.Marshall Tri-Weekly Herald, March 3, 1885). William S. Speer and John H.Brown, eds., Encyclopedia of the New West (Marshall, Texas: United StatesBiographical Publishing, 1881; rpt., Easley, South Carolina: SouthernHistorical Press, 1978). Amelia W. Williams and Eugene C. Barker, eds.,The Writings of Sam Houston, 1813-1863 (8 vols., Austin: University ofTexas Press, 1938-43; rpt., Austin and New York: Pemberton Press, 1970).E. W. Winkler, ed., Secret Journals of the Senate, Republic of Texas(Austin, 1911).

Sallie M. Lentz 
Lane, Judge George (I6922)
 
19 "Last name is GOAS. It is said there was a legend the Goas name was dyingout, so when his then-only son died, he was so grieved he changed hisname to Goss. His son and father's headstone reads Goas, yet his reads Goss, all in the same graveyard. Was of Scottish descent and had been raised in a Pennsylvania Dutch settlement." - Ruth Tipton

"Moved to Pulaski County, Missouri in 1867.

"Moved to Missouri around 1850 with brother his brother, Joe, and his Father, Andrew, leaving his sister, Hannah in PA .

"Worked for a steamship company and sailed the Mississippi River." -RuthTipton

"Lewis was a Civil War (Union orderly?) veteran. [worked in a hospital]

"His mustering-out pay amounted to $75 and with this he bought an80-acre farm f rom a railroad company on the "Old Wire Road" [now called Colley Hollow Road] He and his wife logged, farmed, and died on this farmand in 1985 it was owned by the Charles Storey family. At that time, the lilac bush Henrietta planted there was still blooming." -Ruth Tipton

He was 6 ft tall.

Since these stories are all identical to ones told to me by Iris Painter, I suspect Ruth Tipton is the source of their "traditions" about the Goas family. -tkp

* * * * *

1860 Jefferson Co., MO Census, Page No. 88
Merrimac Township, County of Jefferson, State of Missouri
Twelvth July 1860 by S.C. Hendrickson
P.O. High Ridge
line 28, 693/683 Andrew GOAS 40 M Farmer /150 Penn,
Lewis GOAS 23 M Do. [Farmer] Do [Penn],
Henrietta " 21 f Saxony,
Hannah " 2 f Mo,
William " 5/12 M Mo,
Joseph " 17 M Laborer Penn,
Millener R 13 M Ohio.

1870 Pulaski Co., MO Census, see also: Cullen Township, 176a, noted 1 September 2004, Page No. 13/176A
Cullen Township, County of Pulaski, State of Missouri
11th August 1870 by Allen Warner
P.O. Waynesville
line 4, 84/85 GOAS Lewis 35 MW Farm Laborer /350 Pennsylvania
Henrietta 32 FW Keeping House Baden Father/Mother of foreign birth
Hannah 14 FW At School Missouri Mother of foreign birth attended school
William ww MW " "[At School] do [Missouri] Mother of foreign birth attended school cannot write
Mary 8 FW do [Missouri] Mother of foreign birth attended school
Malinda 6 FW do [Missouri] Mother of foreign birth attended school
Andrew 60 MW Farm Laborer Pennsylvania
Joseph 28 MW do do [Farm Laborer] do [Pennsylvania].

1880 Pulaski Co., MO Census, Page No. 3/362A
S.D. 3
E.D. 144
Cullen Township, County of Pulaski, State of Missouri
3rd June 1880 by V.A.S. Robinson
line 43, 26/26 GOAS Lewis WM 42 M Farmer Penn Penn Penn
Henrieta E WF 41 Wife M Keeping house Saxony Saxony Saxony
Mary A WF 18 Daughter S Mo Penn Saxony
Malinda J WF 15 Daughter S Mo Penn Saxony
line 47, /27 TAYLOR Ransum L WM 26 M Farmer Ky. Ky. Ky.
Hannah WF 22 Wife M Keeping house Mo Penn Saxony
William V WM 4 Son S Mo Ky Mo
Jesse G WM 2 Son S Mo Ky Mo
AUSBERN Margaret WF 10 Servant S Servant attended school cannot write Mo Tenn Tenn.

1900 Pulaski Co., MO Census, Cullen Twp. (West Part), S.D. 8, E.D. 112, Sheet 1B/188B, 4 June 1900 by Thomas R. Cox, line 56, 12/12 GOSS, Lewis Head WM Sept 1837 62 M 42 Pennsylvania Pennsylvania Pennsylvania Farmer, Henrietta Wife WF Aug 1838 61 M 42 5/3 Germany Germany Germany 1852/45.

1910 Pulaski Co., MO Census, Cullen Twp., S.D. 14, E.D. 74, Sheet No. 8B/8B, 28 April 1910 by Seba L. Baker, Richland Road, line 39, 157/158 GOAS, Louis Head MW 72 M1 53 Pennsylvania Pennsylvania Pennsylvania, Henrietta Wife FW 72 M1 53 5/3 Ger.German Ger.German Ger.German 1852.

1920 Pulaski Co., MO Census, Cullen Twp, S.D. 187, E.D. 80, Sheet No. 5B, 16th January 1920 by WR Hickman, line 52, Fm, 36/36 COX Thomas R. Head OF MW 58 M /yes/yes Kentucky Kentucky Kentucky Farmer/own Farm, Malinda J. Wife FW 55 M /yes/yes Missouri Pennsylvania Germany/German, Thomas W. Son MW 10 S yes/yes/yes " MO Kentucky Missouri, GOAS Lewis Fatherinlaw MW 83? Wd /yes/yes Pennsylvania Pennsylvania Pennsylvania, line 56, FM, 37/37 COX Ernest E Head OF MW 29 M /yes/yes Missouri Kentucky Missouri Farmer/own Farm, May L. Wife FW 29 M /yes/yes " MO Tennessee " MO, Lyle? A. Son MW 1/12 " MO Missouri " MO, CAMPBELL Bert Servant MW 20 " MO " MO " MO.

Lewis Goas April 10, 1920 Pulaski 17281 view image [informant: Hannah Taylor, Waynesville. Father: Andrew Goss, Penn; Hannah Lewis, Penn]

Civil War Soldiers and Sailors Database, GOAS, Lewis Union, Infantry, 6th Regiment, Missouri Infantry, Regiment Name 6 Mo. Inf., Union, Alternate Name: Lewis Gaas; Louis Gaas, Film Number: M390 roll 17
GOAS, Joseph Union, Infantry, 6th Regiment, Missouri Infantry, Union, Company B, Pvt., Alternate Name Joseph M./Goas, Film Number M390 roll 17.


Civil War Soldiers and Sailors Database, GOAS, Lewis Union, Infantry, 6th Regiment, Missouri Infantry, Regiment Name 6 Mo. Inf., Union, Alternate Name: Lewis Gaas; Louis Gaas, Film Number: M390 roll 17
GOAS, Joseph Union, Infantry, 6th Regiment, Missouri Infantry, Union, Company B, Pvt., Alternate Name Joseph M./Goas, Film Number M390 roll 17.

Civil War Pension Index: General Index to Pension Files, 1861-1934, ancestry.com, Civil War Pension
Goas, Lewis
6. Mo Inf.
1881?, Mar. 2 Invalid, Application No. 642970, Certificate No. 437868 Missouri. 
Goas, Lewis (I11737)
 
20 "Mrs Thomas Wynn of Malcom" attended Amelia's funeral.
This is Emma Block Wynn, daughter of Ferdinand and Louise Block.
All others listed are family members.

State Iowa
County Poweshiek
Bearcreek Township
s.d. 6, e.d. 95, Sheet No. 17B
26th June 1900 by Leonidas M Bennett
line 63, 395/411 BLOCK Ferdinand Head WM Mar 1845 55 M 19 Germany GermanyGermany 1871/29/?? Farmer Owns Farm Free of mortgage
Louisa A Wife WF July 1864 35 M 19 2/1 Germany Germany Germany 1881/19
Emma I Daughter WF Mar 1883 17 S Iowa Germany Germany House K

State Iowa
County Poweshiek
Bear Creek Township
s.d. 95, e.d. 119, Sheet No. 2B
9th and 10th February 1920 by James J Hanson
line 64, Fm 42/44 WYNN Thomas J Head OM MW 32 M /yes/yes IllinoisIllinois Iowa Farmer/General Farm
Emma I wife FW 35 M /yes/yes Iowa West Prussia/German West Prussia/German
BLOCK Louisa A mother in law FW 55 Wd 1871/Na/1883 /yes/yes WestPrussia/German West Prussia/German West Prussia/German

Also Fred and Johh Block of Brooklyn attended.

Fred W. Block b. Germany 1871/Na
his son John b. 1877 Iowa

1880 United States Census
Fred BLACK Self M MW 40 Prussia R. R. Hand Prussia Prussia
Dora BLACK Wife M FW 26 Prussia Keeping House Prussia Prussia
Enna BLACK Dau S FW 8 IL At School Prussia Prussia
Fred BLACK Son S MW 7 IL Prussia Prussia
Elizabeth BLACK Dau S FW 6 IL Prussia Prussia
John BLACK Son S MW 3 IA Prussia Prussia
Anna BLACK Dau S FW 1 IA Prussia Prussia
Source Information:
Census Place Brooklyn, Poweshiek, Iowa
Family History Library Film 1254362
NA Film Number T9-0362
Page Number 480C


Iowa State Census Collection, 1836-1925. ancestry.com

Name: Amelia Block
Census Date: 1 Jan 1925
Residence County: Poweshiek
Residence State: Iowa
Locality: Jefferson
Birth Location: Germany
Marital Status: Married
Gender: Female
Estimated birth year: abt 1860
Race: White
Relation to Head of House: Wife
Mother: Anna Jeshko
Mother's Birth Location: Germany
Father: Martin Block
Father's Birth Location: Germany
Marriage Location: Germany
Line: 28
Roll: IA1925_1923 
Block, Amelia Johanna (I10365)
 
21 "My Grandmother was a short and fat and parted her hair in the middle -combed it straight down over her ears and made two biscuits at the nape of her neck. I remember her hair as light but I am told her eyes were dark." Sylvia Taylor Painter, WEAKLY YARNAL, Jan. 2, 1962. Boston, Mary Jane (I11727)
 
22 "On the evening of April 11, 1911 a couple registered at the Eureka Hotelin
Carthage, Mo. as Mr. and Mrs. Luther Amos. The next morning they left,
leaving a baby (me) behind. The woman was young, not more than 19, light
complexioned, slightly rounded shoulders. The man was about 30, large and
dark curly hair. Several weeks previsouly he had worked in the lead mines
in Oronogo, Mo and some said he had traveled with a carnival before that.
In the conversation with the landlady, my mother said my name was LillyMae
Bell Amos and that I would be 5 weeks old the next day."

- letter of Esther Capps (c.1934-1940)

Baby Girl is Abandoned, Carthage Evening Press, Monday, April 17, 1911, Left at Rooming House on East Side of the Square * Police Force Now Searching For Young Couple Who Registered as "Mr. and Mrs. Luther Amos": The Carthage police force has a pretty abandoned girl baby on its hands and since there is not a single member of the police force which has a baby in the family, the little thing at once aroused a great deal of interest among all the knights of the stick and gun.
The little girl is a five-weeks old babe, named Lily Amos, and it was left yesterday morning in one of the rooms in the upper story of the Garlnd building on the east side of the square, which are leased for lodging purposes by Mrs. Lavonia Lowe. A couple giving their names as Mr. and Mrs. Luther Amos, with their baby, came here Saturday afternoon from Oronogo and took one of Mrs. Lowe's rooms. Mr. Amos is aged about 30 and Mrs Amos 19.
They told Mrs. Lowe they would leave next morning and paid her in advance the proper amount for the use of the room. The couple left about seven o'clock yesterday morning. An hour or two after they had gone, Mrs. Lowe heard a noise in the room which they had left and on going there found that the couple had left their baby and it had awakened and was crying. All the baby clothes and paraphernalia had been left in the room neatly packed away in a telescope.
The police were notified, and an investigation began. From letters left in the room, it was shown that the Amos couple had been in Oronogo for at least two weeks and had received mail there in that name. The oldest postmark on mail matter left behind was on a letter received two weeks ago from a Joplin photographer who had done some work for them. This couple was here about a week ago and stopped at the same room over one night. At Oronogo, the constable said he knew of the people mentioned, but did no know how long they had been there nor where they had come from. He is investigating further today.
Efforts have been made to learn by what route the couple left Carthage after abandoning the baby, but as there is only a description to go by, it has not yet been learned where they went.
A man and a woman were met on North Main street going to the depot with baggage shortly after seven o'clock, the man going to the Frisco and the woman to the Missouri Pacific depot. Another couple, answering their description, took an interurban car at Fifth street about that time in the morning.
It is a crime to abandon a child, so the parents or alleged parents, would cover their tracks as well as they could after leaving and they may be hard to find. So far as learned, there was not much mystery about the doings of the young couple prior to the abandoning of the babe, and yet if the whole story were known, there might be much mystery about it. This fact lends spice to the investigation. Officer James Hamilton went to Joplin this morning to see what could be learned about them and it was his plan to visit Oronogo too.
The baby was left yesterday to the care of Mrs. Lowe, the landlady, and it was well cared for. The telephone police gong summoned Marshal R. B. Jones to the phone about three o'clock yesterday afternoon, to be informed that it was thought that the police baby was ailing. The marshal hustled around with great solicitude and hunted up City Physician R. W. Webster to administer to its needs. The baby's troubles were found to be only trivial, however.
It is pronounced a hearty, healthy, pretty baby, and how anybody could have the heart to abandon it is a mystery.

* * * * *

It's fairly clear that Esther's parents could have been tracked down, and might have been if Tom Molohon hadn't been so keen to adopt her. He and his wife had had no children survive birth. It is clear from reading the articles that they took her home on the Monday that she was found and had adopted her within a week of her abandonment.

It is even possible that the officer who went to Joplin to find theparents did find them and either got their permission for the Molohons toadopt or threatened them with prosecution if they came forward. The original newspaper article spells out that probability very clearly.

Barring finding a divorce record, it appears that Esther's natural mother was dead by the time Esther was 9. This might help explain why no oneever came looking for her.

Esther was convinced that Della thought she was Tom Molohon'sillegitimate child. She recalled their conversation when Della came out of the room where Tom had just died: Della looked at her and said, "He didn't say anything," which Esther understood to mean that he didn't admit that she was his child. Esther always seemed convinced that he knew her origins.

If the police officer who went to Joplin to track them down succeeded andgot them to agree, either by offering her a good home or by coersion, to let the Molohons adopt then it may be true that he did know. Just not for the reasons she suspected.

She later sought to find out if she might have been the illegitimate daughter of a cousin or relative, someone who might have asked to Tom toadopt their child knowing he and his wife couldn't have any. At onepoint she thought she was the illegitmate daughter of Amy Vinson, adaughter of Mollie Simpson Vinson who never married. Late in life shewas interested in DNA testing to try to discover the truth, but neverpursued it.

I'm convinced that the Luther Amos and wife listed here were her parentsfor several reasons, the foremost of which is that Luther Amos is anunusual name. That they were from the area and their ages match quiteprecisely the ages of the couple who left the baby in the Eureka Hotellends credence to this idea. I suspect that the landlady was able togive the ages because, considering the obvious age difference, she hadchatted with Mrs. Amos about it.

Two couples were mentioned as 'fitting their description' in the original Carthage Evening Press article as having been seen leaving the area at that time. One couple splitting up (one heading for the Frisco trainstation the other for the Missouri Pacific station). The other caught an'interurban' on Fifth street. Luther Amos's mother lived in Joplin,which would have been reachable by interurban. He and his children areliving with her in 1920. He says he is widowed, but his second wife Ellais living in Benton Co., Arkansas at this time. Were they in the processof divorcing? That is unknown, though by 1930 she is "Ella Crane",widowed with her three Amos sons living with her in Texas.

Marriage record notes Luther's first wife as Annie Catherine Sharp, daughter of F.M. Sharp. This is likely the mother of Lillie Maybelle Amos.


* * * * *

Joplin Globe, Joplin, Jasper County, Missouri

Published: 2005-04-08

Esther M. Capps. She was born March 12, 1911, in Jasper County, Mo., andwas the daughter of Thomas J. and Della M. Molohon who operated a dairyfarm east of Carthage in the Maxwell Community. Ester attended Radiumrural school and graduated from Carthage High School in 1929.
On July 1, 1929, she was married in Carthage to Ira A. Capps, whopreceded her in death in 1974.
Esther is survived by a daughter, Delores and husband, William PainterSr., of Carthage and their children, William Painter Jr., of Manchester,England, Mark Painter, of Dallas, Pa., and Christian Painter, of Tulsa,Okla.; son, Bob Capps and wife, Marie, of Carthage, and their son, PaigeCapps, of Carthage; son, Ira Capps and wife, Linda, of Grove, Okla., andtheir children, Cathy Coleman, of Carthage, Julie Aldridge, of Grove,Michael Capps, of Jasper, Ind., and Douglas Capps, of Grove. Additionalsurvivors include nine great-grandchildren and twogreat-great-grandchildren.
Esther was one of the first women in Carthage licensed to sell realestate, working for Southwest Agency and Walter Robinson agency. She latewas a unit manager for a national arts and crafts decorating firm. Formany years she was active in the Jasper County Republican organization,Lincoln Ladies.

Esther experienced a full life and loved to travel. Her tours took herinto every state of the USA, including Hawaii and Alaska, as well asCanada, Mexico, Cuba and the Caribbean. Graveside services will be at 2p.m. Sunday afternoon in Fasken Cemetery. Visitation will be from 3 to 4p.m. Saturday afternoon at Ulmer Funeral Home.

Arrangements are under the direction of Ulmer Funeral Home,Carthage. 
Molohan, Esther Margaret (I1478)
 
23 "She was one of the dear people to me...She always helped me out." - BillPainter, Sr.

Stayed with her family for a month after returning to Missouri from Arkansas (he was twelve) where they were made to feel welcome...it was early Spring. 
Taylor, Myrtle May (I11723)
 
24 "Steve Hughes"
To :
Subject :Sivils Family
Date :Tue, 25 Feb 2003 20:33:31 -0600

My name is Georgia Hughes and my mom was Nola Sivils daughter of SamuelPatton and Ella Navada Hensley from Wewoka,Seminole Co. Okla. I wouldlove to compare notes as I have quite abit of information on the Okla.Sivils. I have been searching for the Tenn. group for a number of years.Please e-mail me when you have the chance. Your Sivils kin I'm sureGeorgia 
Sivils, Samuel P. (I3204)
 
25 "The [Davidson] family must have been in Maury County, however, inSeptember, 1814, when two sons, Joshua and Bracket, volunteered for sixmonths service in the War of 1812. Bracket, the younger, was 17--nearinghis 18th birthday (November 17). Bracket was wounded 'on the evening ofDecember 23, 1814, being engaged with the enemy at or near a place calledNew Orleans.'" -Kathy McGee

www.rootsweb.com, Dale Davidson
Vet. of the War of 1812. Wounded in right hand at the battle of NewOrleans Dec. 23, 1814. Dr. David Ker, Surgeon General at New Orleans, LA,Certified his disability, he could not use the hand for any type oflabor. Noted David Ker was the father-in-law of Dr. Richard Davidson'sson. Richard was Brackett's 1st cousin.

http://homepages.rootsweb.com/~genea/Dmo1850.html, 1850 DALLAS COUNTYCreated 1841 from Polk Co, page 357-361, Dist. 26: Davison George 30 M W(s/o Brackett Davison & Delilah Hardison) TN, Rebecca (nee Wollard) 31F W (m. 22 Jan 1839 Polk Co Mo) TN, James M. 5 M W MO, Margaret E. 1 FW MO (1850 Dallas Co Mo) (1860 Dallas Co Mo) (1870 Dallas Co Mo)p451-255 Dist. 26, Davison Brackett 53 M W (s/o George Davison &Lucretia McDearmon) VA, Delila (nee Hardison) 47 F W (m 3 Aug 1817 MauryCo Tn) NC, William 18 M W TN, Joshua 14 M W TN, Mary J. 12 F W TN, JohnH. 6 M W MO 
Davison, Bracket (I6324)
 
26 # Battin, Judge William and F. A. Moscrip, "Albert Alonzo Gile," Past andPresent in Marshall County, Iowa (Indianapolis, IN.: B. F. Bowen & Co.,1912).
http://www.rootsweb.com/~iabiog/marshall/m1912/m1912.htm
"One of the best known and most successful members of this family isAlbert Alonzo Gile, who was born in Jasper county, Iowa, September 13,1857, the son of William Fletcher Gile, who was born in Boone county,Indiana, August 21, 1833, the son of Jacob and Elizabeth (Hacker) Gile,the former born in Ohio in 1807, and the latter's birth also occurred inthe Buckeye state, in 1808. From there they moved to Boone county,Indiana, about 1831, in the early pioneer days, and they landed in Jaspercounty, Iowa, on October 8, 1857, and there the death of the elder Gileoccurred on August 4, 1863; his widow went to Nemaha county, Nebraska,where her death occurred on March 22, 1874. They were the parents of fivesons and four daughters, three of whom are living at this writing. In anearly day Jacob Gile hauled freight from Cincinnati to Lebanon, Indiana.He was a wagon maker by trade. In politics he was a Whig, but laterbecame a Republican. He and his wife were members of the MethodistEpiscopal church and active in the same, in fact, Mr. Gile was a localminister. 
Gile, Albert A. (I577)
 
27 1. Catherine Goas
Birth: 11 Jul 1820 - , , Pennsylvania
Christening:
Death: 28 Aug 1902 - Winnebago Prairie, Stearns, Minnesota
Burial: Aug 1902 - Winnebago Prairie, Stearns, Minnesota
Cause of Death:
AFN #:

1. *Samuel Dayton
Marriage: 1 Jul 1841 - , Venango County, Pennsylvania
Possibly once lived in New Castle, Pennsylvania
Marriage Notes (Samuel Dayton)

Lived in New York, Pennsylvania, Wisconsin, and Iowa according to JoyceDayton Brandstetter, 328 17th Ave. No., Onalaska, Wisconsin 54650 (11 May2000).

They separated in 1870, Catherine took the younger children and went tolive with her son Clark.

State Minnesota
County Stearns
Brockway Township, s.d. 6, e.d. 141, Sheet No. 2A/45A
second June 1900 by John J. Schulthus?
line 27, 23/23 DAYTON Wm Head WM July 1860 39 M 16 Minnesota New YorkPennsylvania Laborer [lives house, doesn't say whether owned or rented]
Magie Wife WF Aug 1862 37 M 16 9/9 Dist of Columbia England New Jersey
Ebben Son WM Aug 1884 15 S Minnesota Minnesota Dist of Columbia at school7 months
Elenor Daughter WF Sept 1885 14 S Minnesota Minnesota Dist of Columbia atschool 7 months
Elvin Son WM Dec 1887 12 S Minnesota Minnesota Dist of Columbia at school7 months
Lottie Daughter WF Mar 1884 10 S Minnesota Minnesota Dist of Columbia
Alfred Son WM Feb 1891 8 S Minnesota Minnesota Dist of Columbia
Clark Son WM Feb 1896 4 S Minnesota Minnesota Dist of Columbia
Albert Son WM Feb 1896 4 S Minnesota Minnesota Dist of Columbia
Williard Son WM Aug 1898 1 S Minnesota Minnesota Dist of Columbia
line 45, 25/25 DAYTON Clark Head WM Feb 1850 50 M 6 Pennsylvania New YorkPennsylvania Farmer Owns Farm Free of mortgage
Abby Wife WF Sept 1850 M 6 1/1 New York Ireland New York
Leon? Son MW Apr 1878 22 S Iowa Pennsylvania Wisconsin Blacksmith
line 48, 26/26 CROSBY Albert Head WM July 1861 38 M 15 Minnesota MaineMaine Carpenter Owns Mortgaged Farm
Lottie Wife WF Oct 1863 36 M 15 7/6 Wisconsin Pennsylvania Pennsylvania
Edgar son WM Apr 1885 15 S Minnesota Minnesota Wisconsin Farm laborer
pg. 2B
line 1, CROSBY Val? Son WM Sept 1887 12 S Minnesota Minnesota Wisconsinat school 7 months
Charles Son WM Apr 1891 9 S Minnesota Minnesota Wisconsin
William Son WM Feb 1893 7 S Minnesota Minnesota Wisconsin
Burton Son WM Mar 1895 5 S Minnesota Minnesota Wisconsin
Ethel Daughter WF May 1897 3 S Minnesota Minnesota Wisconsin
Sarah Mother WF May 1828 72 Wd 9/8 Maine Maine Maine
DAYTON Catharine Mother in law WF July 1820 79 Wd 13/12 PennsylvaniaPennsylvania Pennsylvania 
Goas, Catherine (I12716)
 
28 103. LEVY GILBERT5 HUDSON (JAMES GILBERT4, MALISSA CATHERINE3 PARKER,JOHN GARRISON2, JONATHAN1) was born November 28, 1905. He married PARELEESTONECIPHER May 08, 1926 in Marion County Arkansas, daughter of MARIONSTONECIPHER and BERTHA ???.

Children of LEVY HUDSON and PARELEE STONECIPHER are:

i. PAUL EDDIE6 HUDSON.

229. ii. RUTH MARIE HUDSON, b. Private, Goodman McDonaldCo. Missouri. 
Stonecipher, Cordelia Parelee Leora "Parelee" (I4564)
 
29 110 CP# VPB37p210 10 September 1767 Christopher Slinker 200a Bedford Co. on both sides of D. Slinker, Christopher (I11836)
 
30 11th Missouri
Company K
Confederate
Mathew Maberry 
Maberry, Silas (I8429)
 
31 11th Missouri
Company K/F
Wesley Gibson
J.W. Gibson 
Gibson, Wesley (I7015)
 
32 11th Regiment Missouri Infantry
Company K
Gibson, J.W. (and F)
Gibson, Wesley (and F)
Maberry, Mathew (also Mayberry)
Scott, John
Scott, Robert (and F)
Scott, W.L. (and F)
Burris, Newton
Burris, Jasper
Healt, Enoch (and F) also Holt/Holte
Holt/Holte, Henry (and F)
Hight, Nathaniel
Huffman, J.M.
Martin, E.M./E.N.
Martin, W.G.
Martin, William
Witherspoon, John W.
Witherspoon, William D.
Witherspoon, Winfrey B.


Company F
Scott, G.W.
Gilmore, J.R.

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
familysearch.org
https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1-16954-16879-65?cc=1865475&wc=7122767
image 502/954
noted 7 Oct 2011
Application for Admission
to the
Confederate Soldiers' Home
at Higginsville, Missouri
State of Missouri
County of Jasper
I, Robert N Scott
hereby apply for admission to the CONFEDERATE HOME, at Higginsville Missouri. My full name is
Robert Newton Scott
Occupation Farmer I was born August 15th 1843
My present residence is Scotland County of Jasper State of Missouri.
I have lived continuously in the State of Missouri, for Two years immediately
preceding this application.

When enlisted, with Rank
Fall 1861
Private

Where Enlisted, Town and State
Cowskin Prairie
McDanold Co Mo

Company and Regiment Mustered in.
Co. K. Hunter's
Afterward Bueres Regt

Date and Place of Discharge with Rank
Command Surrendered in Arkans.
I was Bogty? Depot
on furlough visiting a Brother with

Cause of Discharge
End of war
Parole was sent me
which was worn out
+ lost.

If wounded, give date and name of engagement? wounded at fight at Prairie Grove
Arkansas in leg. was struck in back with a piece of Bomb slight injury near Fayetteville Ark
State if you were conscripted, or did you enlist as a substitute? volunteer

AFFIDAVIT OF APPLICANT.
That he served honorably during the war in said army and was true and loyal to the government of
the Confederate States to the end of the war, and that he has borne a good character ever since; that he is
74 years of age; that he is unmarried; that he is of Ruddy complexion, 5 feet 9 inches
feet in height; that his nearest relative is William Scott as son
whose postoffice is RFD No 1 Diamond Mo; that because of Rheumatism
and old age he, the said Robert N. Scott
is unable to provide for and support himself, and therefore he makes this his application for admission
to the "SOLDIER'S HOME"; and he swears or affirms that he is a person of sobriety and good habits, of
sound mind and, if admitted as an inmate to said Home, he hereby agrees to abide by and obey all the rules
and regulations made by the proper authorities of the Home for its government, and that he will perform all
[other side of page not on microfilm]

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Missouri State Board of Health
Bureau of Vital Statistics
Certificate of Death
Reg. Dist. 460
Primary Reg. Dist. 5624-a
File No. 20044
Registered No. 23

Place of Death:
County Lafayette
Township Dover
City Confed Home

Robt. N Scott
male/white/widowed
[x put in place wife's name should be if married, widowed or divorced]
Date of birth: Aug 15, 1843
Age: 76 years
Occupation: Farmer
Birthplace: Unknown
Name of father: Unknown
Name of mother: Unknown
Informant: JT Grimes, Higginsville

Date of Death:
June 8, 1919
[all other usual questions answered by the doctor are answered with an x]
Cause of Death:
Died at dressing table
probably of heart trouble
[signed] W.C. Webb, M.D., June 8, 1919, Higginsville

Place of burial:
Confederate Home
Date of burial:
June 9, 1919
Undertaker: A.H. Hader, Higginsville 
Scott, Robert Newton (I6388)
 
33 13 Feb 1872 THURMAN, MILTON / SCOTT, JULIA COLEMAN, G W A112 Family F3517
 
34 1339 W. 84th Street, S.D. 1, E.D. 261, Sheet No. 13B Painter, Howard Andrew "Andrew" (I1169)
 
35 1787 RUSSELL COUNTY VIRGINIA PERSONAL PROPERTY TAX LIST, SAMUEL RITCHIESLIST

Note: First figure after name refers to number of tithables over 21.Second figure after name refers to number of tithables age
16 and under age 21.

LOWER DISTRICT

Osborn, James 1
Osborn, James 1
Osborn, Squire 1
Osborn, Stephen 1
Osborn, Thomas 1
Osborn, William 1

Squire Osborn was probably born in Rowan Co., North Carolina, and died atthe confluence of the Big Sandy and Ohio River. It is thought that thathe was a nephew of Thomas Osborn because of his will settlement.

Squire Osborn served in Capt. Brevard's co., Col. Abram Shepherd's 10thReg. He enlisted25 May 1781 and was discharged 25 April 1782. (N.C.State Records, Clark's Vol. XVI). He appeared first in Russell Co., VArecords 7 July 1787 (LOB 1-28] and was last recorded there in 1804, whennamed for jury duty.

http://home.att.net/~osborne_origins/biograph/newbio7.htm#Osburn_William_R
Bio. of William R. Osburn-1122
History of Franklin County, Indiana, Indianapolis, B.F. Bowen & Co.,Inc., 1915. Page 872. (transcript)
[See the bio. of George R. Osburn-1113]
[See the bio. of William H. Osborn]
[See the bio. of Joseph J. Harvey]

WILLIAM R. OSBURN.
The Osburn family, worthily represented in Franklin county at thepresent
time by William R. Osburn, was one of the very first families to locate in
Franklin county. In fact, the first members of the family located here in
1799, a year before Indiana was made a territory, fourteen years before
Franklin county was organized and seventeen years before Indiana was
admitted to the union. During this long period of one hundred and sixteen
years succeeding generations of the family have been active participantsin
every phase of development of the county. A complete history of theOsburn
family and its connection with the various interests of the county wouldbe,
in a large measure, the history of Franklin county. In fact, the comingof
this family to this county antedates, the county organization many years,
the Osburns having been among the earliest and most prominent settlers of
this section.
William R. Osburn, son of George Riley and Martha F. (Sutfin) Osburn,was
born in Butler township, November 26, 1867. His father was born in thesame
township, September 26, 1828, and his mother was a native of the same
township, the date of her birth being March 26, 1842. William R. Osburnis
the only one of the nine children born to his parents who is now living.
George R. Osburn was educated in the public schools of his hometownship
and remained at home until the opening of the Civil War. He enlisted
January 1, 1862, in Company B, Fifty-second Regiment Indiana Volunteer
Infantry, and served until he was finally discharged from the service
September 10, 1865, at Montgomery, Alabama. Among many other battles in
which he was engaged, he participated in the engagement at Fort Donaldson,
Nashville and Mobile. George R. Osburn was married in 1866 and the year
following moved to Denver township, Richland county, Illinois, where he
lived until 1901. He then returned to the old homestead in Brookville
township, Franklin county, Indiana, and lived there until his death in1909.
His wife had preceded him to the grave several years, her death having
occurred in Illinois in 1901.
William R. Osburn moved with his parents to Illinois before he was ayear
old and lived in Illinois until 1901. In that year he returned to this
county with his father and settled down on the old homestead of twohundred
and sixteen acres which he now owns. He has engaged in general farmingand
stock raising with such success as to entitle him to the name of a
progressive farmer.
Mr. Osburn was married in 1894 to Susie Willhite, who was born in
Illinois, a daughter of Thomas and Elizabeth Willhite, both of whom are
deceased.
Mr. Osburn always has given his hearty support to the Republican party
and has always taken an intelligent interest in political affairs,although
he has never aspired to office. His wife is a member of the Methodistchurch
and Mr. Osburn contributes to the support of this denomination. He is a
Mason, a member of the Royal Arch degree, holding membership atBrookville.
He is also an Odd Fellow. Mr. Osburn is a man well worthy of the high
esteem in which he is held throughout the community and is a sterling
representative of a family which has always been active in promoting the
best interests of Franklin county.
In view of the fact that the Osburn familv is one of the oldestfamilies
of the county, it seems particularly fitting that the followinggenealogical
history of the family be here included, this history of the family notonly
being interesting from a personal standpoint but also valuable as throwing
an interesting light on the early history of the county.
The paternal grandsire of the Osburn generation whose descendants
settled in Franklin county, Indiana, was one of the first men in Kentucky,
and was accidentally drowned in the Ohio river near the mouth of the Big
Sandy, about 1796. This pioneer was of English nativity, his mother and
father came from Wales and England and resided in Scott county, Virginia.
Wishing to seek a home in the West, the father was bringing his family
to Kentucky when he lost his life by his canoe upsetting. His widow and
only son, James T. Osburn, Jr., who was aged ten years, continued westward
to the town of Boonsboro, Kentucky, where they remained one year,returning
to Virginia in 1797.
In the spring of 1798, this young man and his mother came west thesecond
time, traveling overland on horseback, his four sisters accompanying them.
They started from Abington, Virginia, on the banks of the Clinch river,and
finally after enduring many hardships reached Fort Washington, later on
named Cincinnati, going from there to Boonsboro, Kentucky, a portion ofthis
lonesome and wearisome journey being only a blazed trail, and thewilderness
of timber through which they journeyed being inhabited by wanderingIndians.
In the summer of 1799 these pioneers along with other emigrants came to
the wilds of Indiana territory, and located temporarily on a tract of land
near Metamora. The territorial lands had not at that early day beenthrown
open for entry or even taken as a homestead until September of 1804.
Something over one hundred years ago, this part of Indiana was not
generally settled; there was plenty of land and only small colonies and
settlements. It was fashionable to get married early in life, have large
families and populate the country, for then a home could be secured almost
for the asking and at not to exceed one dollar and twenty-five cents per
acre.
In the autumn of 1809, James T. Osburn, Jr., who had passed histwentieth
birthday anniversary, along with seven other young men of the West Fork
community decided their happiness would be increased by committingmatrimony
by wholesale and creating a little excitement and fresh material for the
gossips to digest.
Therefore, by a special agreement, the young men took their sweethearts
horseback behind them and struck the trail leading to Big Cedar creek, to
the home of Elder DeWeese, where they had their hearts and hands welded in
matrimony. This itinerant preacher did not make any charge for hisservices
because the Good Book suggested that mankind multiply and replenish.
This pioneer and his faithful wife set up housekeeping near the site of
St. Mary's church at Haymond, Indiana, and during his lifetime, was
prominently connected in the affairs of his community and county. He wasa
typical Virginian and prided himself on assisting the needy and distressed
and demonstrating his hospitality. He considered a good name preferableto
riches, yet he is said to have possessed both.
The result of James T. Osburn's venture and matrimonial union waseleven
children, six sons and five daughters.
Just here will state for the Osburn descendants (who are numerous) that
Captain James T. Osburn was a militia captain under General Noble.
It is related that Capt. James T. Osburn, who was a crack shot with a
rifle, killed four black bears while going to a neighbor's cabin a fewmiles
from Haymond. This frontiersman, while out hunting for deer one antumn,
killed one of the largest timber rattlesnakes ever seen in Franklincounty.
It measured twenty-four inches in circumference and had twenty-fourrattles,
hence it could give warning if disturbed; he was an athlete and expert
wrestler, and often mingled with the Indians and shot with a bow and arrow
and with his trusty rifle at a mark.
Mrs. Jane Harvey, wife of Squire Harvey and eldest daughter of Capt.
James T. Osburn and wife, furnished many thrilling incidents of hergirlhood
days. She related that her father when he went out on a hunting tour tobe
absent several days, carried punk and flint to start a fire, for matcheshad
not been invented; a large needle, and thread made of catgut, plenty of
powder, bullets and patching for his gun, a hunting knife, hand-axe,
corn-pone bread, salt and pepper, and a turkey caller which composed his
outfit. On one occasion, when he had his hunting dog along and hadwounded
a fine buck that had taken refuge in a hole of water in Pipe creek the dog
swam to the deer and it ripped the dog open, its entrails protruding.After
dispatching the deer, Mr. Osburn turned his attention to his onlycompanion,
the dog, sewed up the wound and the dog lived three years. Mrs. Harveytold
how in early days, about 1829, the settlers put bells on the stock running
at large. They had a herd of cattle in the woods; the wolves got afterthe
cattle and they headed for home, the howling of the wolves and bells
clanging on frightened cattle made a medley of sounds most discordant tothe
ear. The wolves killed one of the best heifers and devoured the animal.
Captain Osburn with the help of neighbors erected a wolf trap and nextnight
had the satisfaction of finding three full-grown wolves in the pen. Mrs.
Harvey accompanied her father to the trap.
One special incident related by Mrs. Jane Harvey may he of importanceto
those interested in the early history of Franklin county regarding the
Indians. Many of the pioneer trappers and hunters of the Whitewater
found it was policy to keep on friendly terms with the red men. In theyear
1833 when Mrs. Harvey was twelve years old, she accompanied her father and
mother to the last camp of about forty Indians located on Indian creek in
Metamora township, preparatory to their removal to a reservation. It was
their farewell pow-wow and the Indians were loath to leave such finehunting
grounds.
Our readers will pardon us for giving incidents of pioneer people, but,
as many enjoy reminiscences of this character, will relate a few more
historical facts relating to the Osburn ancestors and their descendants.
Everybody about St. Marys of the Rock and in the Pipe creek country knows
Squire Osburn as the genial, honorable and generally hospitable farmer,
who is the last son of the original Osburn family. He carries the earmarks
as, regards sociability of his father and the Virginians of ancestralfame.
George Riley Osburn, whose death occurred November 20, 1909, was a
soldier during the Rebellion. He enlisted on January 1, 1862, in CompanyB,
Fifty-second Indiana infantry, and fought for the Stars and Stripes andthe
preservation of our Union.
As stated previously in this narrative, George Riley Osburn, the fifth
child of his father's family of eleven, remained at the old homestead near
St. Mary's and farmed and taught school until 1867, when he and his wifeand
family removed to Richland county, Illinois. He was the owner of three
hundred acres of fine black soil, but sickness and the death of his wifeand
six children discouraged him to remain in a malarial country, hence Mr.
Osborn sold out and he and his remaining son, William, returned toFranklin
county where it was more healthful.
If our readers will be patient, will digress and give a briefhistorical
account of the naming of Cincinnati and how it came about. The emigration
westward from eastern and middle states in 1787 was very great. The
commander at Fort Harmer, at the mouth of the Muskingum, reported four
thousand five hundred persons as haying passed that post between February
and June of 1788.
In January, 1788, Matthias Denman, of New Jersey, took an activeinterest
in the "Simms Purchase," and located among other tracts the sections upon
which Cincinnati has been built. Mr. Filson, who had been a schoolmaster,
was appointed to name the town and he named it Losantiville, which
interpreted means: ville, the town; anti, against or opposite to; as, the
mouth; and L, for Licking river opposite.
Fort Washington was established after Fort Vincennes was erected during
the earlier part of the troublesome Indian wars under General St. Clairand
General Anthony Wayne, and the town proper was called by the name
Losantiville. As stated, in 1799, its name was changed by Governor St.
Clair to Cincinnati and was the headquarters of the military and capitolof
the Northwest territory.
During the stampede from New Jersey, Virginia and the southern statesby
emigrants seeking homes in the northwest along the Ohio river to Kentucky
and what was then called Indiana territory, there were thousands whosettled
in this state. Among these many settlers was the Osburn family. The wife
of Capt. James T. Osburn, Ruth Nelson, was an own cousin of President
William Henry Harrison.
To return to the Osburn genealogy, we have tried to give a scattering
history, dating back to the Revolutionary War, from the fact that Captain
Osburn's father and his father's brother were both veterans of the War for
Independence.
Ruth (Nelson) Osburn died March 20, 1857. Captain James T. Osburn's
death occurred April 5, 1859, in his seventy-third year.
It has been one hundred and fourteen years since the ancestral Osburn
family emigrated from Kentucky to Indiana, and one hundred andtwenty-seven
years since Captain Osburn's father, who could not swim, fell out of his
canoe and was drowned.
Squire Osborn, now in his seventy-sixth year, and Mrs. Mary Schakel,his
aged sister, aged eighty-one years, are the only survivors of this
historical family.

http://www.rootsweb.com/~varussel/court/ruscolobk1.html
P58 - Court at William Robenson's July 7, 1787, examination of SquireOsborn on suspicion of feloniously stealing a bay mare, property of JohnKendrick, prosecuted by John Kendrick. Present: Andrew Cowan, SamuelRitchie, Thomas Carter, John Thompson. Pleaded not guilty. Squire Osbornordered to be tried at the next court held in Richmond. Remanded to gaol.
P59 - John Kendrick, Thomas White, William Crockett, Ambrose Fletcher,Richard Crunk to appear in Richmond to give evidence in the case againstSquire Osborn.
P122 - Commonwealth vs Squire Osborn, presentment of the grand jury forprofane swearing. Def found guilty


Russell Co., VA, 1794 TaxList, (noted 4 November 2005)
James Osborn (1)
James Osborn (1)
Jonathan Osborn (1)
Squire Osborn (1)
Stephen Osborn (3). 
Osborn, Squire (I1386)
 
36 1810 Caldwell KY
pg. 391
[line 10] Mosses CLAYTON 21100 1100 [1M 16-25 (b. 1785-1794) Jesse, 1F10-15 (b. 1795-1800) Polly, 1M 10-15 (b. 1795-1800) William, 1F 0-9 (b.1801-1810), 2M 0-9 (b. 1801-1810) John S. & Woodson] - believe parentsare missing from this enumeration
[line 13] John CLAYTON 30010 2121 [1M 26-44 (b. 1766-1784) John, 1F 26-44(b. 1766-1784), 2F 16-25 (b. 1785-1794), 1F 10-15 (b. 1795-1800) Rutha,3M 0-9 (b. 1801-1810) Moses, William & John C., 2F 0-9 (b. 1801-1810)Elizabeth]
pg. 394?
[line 10] John D CLAYTON 00100 0000
[Eddyville Twp.]
pg. 414
[line 6] Francis CLAYTON 00101 001 [1M 26-44 (b. 1766-1784) Francis, 1M16-25 (b. 1785-1794), 1F 16-25 (b. 1785-1794)]

1820 Caldwell
pg. 32
[line 61] John G. CLAYTON 100010 20100 01 [1M 26-44, ]
pg. 34
[line 27] Francis CLAYTON 000001 00001 [1M 45+ (b. bef. 1775), 1F 45+]
[line 28] Francis CLAYTON Jr 100100 0001 [1M 16-25 (b. 1795-1804)
[line 31] Huel CLAYTON 210010 2001
pg. 40
[line 36] ??mes? CLAYTON 010001 02021 02 [1M 45+ (b. bef. 1775) James?,1F 45+ (b. bef. 1775), 2F 26-44, 1M 10-15 (b. 1805-1810), 2F 10-15 (b.1805-1810)]
pg. 41
[line 57] Wm CLAYTON 000100 21000 01 [1M 16-25 (b. 1795-1804) William, 1F10-15 (b. 1805-1810) Betsy, 2F 0-9 (b. 1811-1820) Phebe & Sarah]
pg. 43
[line 21] Moses CLAYTON 211101 01101 03 [1M 45+ (b. bef. 1775) Moses, 1F45+ (b. bef. 1775), 1M 16-25 (b. 1795-1804)/1M 16-18 (b. 1802-1804) JohnS., 1F 16-25 (b. 1795-1804), 1M 10-15 (b. 1805-1810) Woodson, 1F 10-15(b. 1805-1810), 2M 0-9 (b. 1811-1820) ? & George W.]
[line 22] Jesse CLAYTON 000100 40100 01 [1M 16-25 (b. 1795-1804) Jesse,1F 16-25 (b. 1795-1804) Jane, 4F 0-9 (b. 1811-1820)]

1830 Caldwell KY
pg. 279/140 alloted to Jsse? Pemberton
[line 15] Woodson CLAYTON 10021 111 [1M 20-29 (b. 1801-1810) Woodson, 2M15-19 (b. 1811-1815) ? & George W., 1F 10-14 (b. 1816-1820), 1F 5-9 (b.1821-1825), 1M 0-4 (b. 1826-1830), 1F 0-4 (b. 1826-1830]]
[line 26] Francis CLAYTON 3010101 030001 [1M 40-49 (b. 1781-1790)Francis, 1F 30-39 (b. 1791-1800), 1M 20-29 (b. 1801-1810), 1M 10-14 (b.1816-1820), 3F 5-9 (b. 1821-1825), 3M 0-4 (b. 1826-1830)]
1830 Calloway KY
pg. 191
John G. CLAYTON 0200001 1000?1 [1M 40-49, 1F 30-39, 2M 5-9 (1821-1825),1F 0-4, 1F 20-29?]
1830 Morgan IL
pg. 168/85
allotted to Joseph Morton
[line 3] Wm CLAYTON Jr 10001 00001 [1M 20-29 (b. 1801-1810) William, 1F20-29 (b. 1801-1810) Minerva, 1M 0-4 (b. 1826-1830)]
[line 4] Wm CLAYTON 000001 11201 [1M 30-39 (b. 1791-1800) William, 1F20-29 (b. 1801-1810) Betsy, 2F 10-14 (b. 1816-1820) Phebe & Sarah, 1F 5-9(b. 1821-1825) Polly, 1F 0-4 (b. 1826-1830) Minerva]
[line 13] John CLAYTON 00110001 00100001 [1M 50-59 (b. 1771-1780) John,1F 50-59 (b. 1771-1780), 1M 15-19 (b. 1821-1825), 1F 10-14 (b.1816-1820), 1M 10-14 (b. 1816-1820)]
[line 14] Moses CLAYTON 20001 0001 [1M 20-29 (b. 1801-1810) Moses, 1F15-19 (b. 1811-1815), 2M 0-4 (b. 1826-1830)]

1835 Morgan, IL State Census
AUSTIN CLAYTON pg. 59
J. S. CLAYTON pg. 108
JESSE CLAYTON pg. 109
JOHN CLAYTON pg. 107
WILLIAM C. CLAYTON pg. 107
WILLIAM H. CLAYTON pg. 107

1840 Morgan IL
pg. 468, allotted to John Wyatt
[line 2] William CLAYTON 0000001 111111 [1M 40-49 (b. 1791-1800) William,1F 30-39 (b. 1801-1810) Betsy, 1F 20-29 (b. 1811-1820) Sarah, 1F 15-19(b. 1821-1825) Minerva, 1F 10-14 (b. 1826-1830) Alpha, 1F 5-9 (b.1831-1835) Margaret, 1F 0-4 (b. 1836-1840) Drucilla]
[line 3] Frances CLAYTON 00011 00001 [1M 20-29 (b. 1811-1820) Francis, 1F20-29 (b. 1811-1820) Phebe, 1M 15-19 (b. 1821-1825)]
[line 4] William C CLAYTON 011001001 010011001 [1M 60-69, 1F 60-69, 1M30-39 (b. 1801-1810), 1F 30-39 (b. 1801-1810), 1F 20-29 (b. 1811-1820),1M 10-14 (b. 1826-1830), 1F 5-9 (b. 1831-1835), 1M 5-9 (b. 1831-1835)]
[line 5] George CLAYTON 01101 00001 [1M 20-29, 1F 20-29, 1M 10-14 (b.1826-1830), 1M 5-9 (b. 1831-1835)] 
Clayton, Moses (I9068)
 
37 1810 Green
pg. 249
[line 30] Henry SLINKER 31010 20010 0 0 [1M 26-44 (b. 1766-1784), 1F26-44 (b. 1766-1784), 1M 10-15 (b. 1795-1800), 2F 0-9 (b. 1801-1810), 3M0-9 (b. 1801-1810)]

pg. 251
[line 24] Saml LARUE 1101 2201 [1M 26-44 (b. 1766-1784), 1F 26-44 (b.1766-1784), 1M 10-15 (b. 1795-1800), 2F 10-15 (b. 1795-1800), 1M 0-9 (b.1801-1810), 2F 0-9 (b. 1801-1810)]
[line 27] John SLINKER 11101 11110 0 0 [1M 45+ (b. bef. 1765), 1F26-44 (b. 1766-1784), 1M 16-25 (b. 1785-1794), 1F 16-25 (b. 1785-1794),1M 10-15 (b. 1795-1800), 1F 10-15 (b. 1795-1800), 1M 0-9 (b. 1801-1810),1F 0-9 (b. 1801-1810)]
[line 28] Malinda SLINKER 10000 1020 0 0 [2F 16-25 (b. 1785-1794), 1M0-9 (b. 1801-1810), 1F 0-9 (b. 1801-1810)]

pg. 253
Town of Greenburgh
[line 24] Henry SLINKER 30010 21010 0 0 [1M 26-44 (b. 1766-1784), 1F26-44 (b. 1766-1784), 1F 10-15 (b. 1795-1800), 3M 0-9 (b. 1801-1810), 2F0-9 (b. 1801-1810)]
[line 25] Fred'k SLINKER 21101 12101 1 0 [1M 45+ (b. bef. 1765), 1F45+ (b. bef. 1765), 1M 16-25 (b. 1785-1794), 1F 16-25 (b. 1785-1794), 1M10-15 (b. 1795-1800), 2F 10-15 (b. 1795-1800), 2M 0-9 (b. 1801-1810), 1F0-9 (b. 1801-1810)]

pg. 261
[line 28] Daniel GALLOWAY 20101 12111 [1M 45+ (b. bef. 1765), 1F 45+ (b.bef. 1765), 1F 26-44 (b. 1766-1784), 1M 16-25 (b. 1785-1794), 1F 16-25(b. 1785-1794), 2F 10-15 (b. 1795-1800), 2M 0-9 (b. 1801-1810), 1F 0-9(b. 1801-1810)]
[line 38] John SLINKER 11101 1101 [1M 45+ (b. bef. 1765), 1F 26-44 (b.1766-1784), 1M 16-25 (b. 1785-1794), 1F 10-15 (b. 1795-1800), 1M 10-15(b. 1795-1800), 1F 0-9 (b. 1801-1810), 1M 0-9 (b. 1801-1810)][slinker.FTW]

1810 Green
pg. 249
[line 30] Henry SLINKER 31010 20010 0 0 [1M 26-44 (b. 1766-1784), 1F26-44 (b. 1766-1784), 1M 10-15 (b. 1795-1800), 2F 0-9 (b. 1801-1810), 3M0-9 (b. 1801-1810)]

pg. 251
[line 24] Saml LARUE 1101 2201 [1M 26-44 (b. 1766-1784), 1F 26-44 (b.1766-1784), 1M 10-15 (b. 1795-1800), 2F 10-15 (b. 1795-1800), 1M 0-9 (b.1801-1810), 2F 0-9 (b. 1801-1810)]
[line 27] John SLINKER 11101 11110 0 0 [1M 45+ (b. bef. 1765), 1F26-44 (b. 1766-1784), 1M 16-25 (b. 1785-1794), 1F 16-25 (b. 1785-1794),1M 10-15 (b. 1795-1800), 1F 10-15 (b. 1795-1800), 1M 0-9 (b. 1801-1810),1F 0-9 (b. 1801-1810)]
[line 28] Malinda SLINKER 10000 1020 0 0 [2F 16-25 (b. 1785-1794), 1M0-9 (b. 1801-1810), 1F 0-9 (b. 1801-1810)]

pg. 253
Town of Greenburgh
[line 24] Henry SLINKER 30010 21010 0 0 [1M 26-44 (b. 1766-1784), 1F26-44 (b. 1766-1784), 1F 10-15 (b. 1795-1800), 3M 0-9 (b. 1801-1810), 2F0-9 (b. 1801-1810)]
[line 25] Fred'k SLINKER 21101 12101 1 0 [1M 45+ (b. bef. 1765), 1F45+ (b. bef. 1765), 1M 16-25 (b. 1785-1794), 1F 16-25 (b. 1785-1794), 1M10-15 (b. 1795-1800), 2F 10-15 (b. 1795-1800), 2M 0-9 (b. 1801-1810), 1F0-9 (b. 1801-1810)]

pg. 261
[line 28] Daniel GALLOWAY 20101 12111 [1M 45+ (b. bef. 1765) Daniel, 1F45+ (b. bef. 1765) Rebecca, 1F 26-44 (b. 1766-1784), 1M 16-25 (b.1785-1794) Isham, 1F 16-25 (b. 1785-1794), 2F 10-15 (b. 1795-1800)Elizabeth, 2M 0-9 (b. 1801-1810) Edmund and Joel, 1F 0-9 (b. 1801-1810)]
[line 38] John SLINKER 11101 1101 [1M 45+ (b. bef. 1765), 1F 26-44 (b.1766-1784), 1M 16-25 (b. 1785-1794), 1F 10-15 (b. 1795-1800), 1M 10-15(b. 1795-1800), 1F 0-9 (b. 1801-1810), 1M 0-9 (b. 1801-1810)] 
Galloway, Daniel (I11771)
 
38 1820 in Rutherford County, Tennessee. 21001-1001 (2m -10, 1m 10-16, 1m26-45: 2f -10, 1f 26-45)
1830 in Rutherford County, Tennessee, 2113001-11111101
1840 in Newton Co., Missouri. 01111001-0110001 
Boyd, John (I6140)
 
39 1820 Monroe TN
pg. 213
[line 18] Kemp SCOTT 100010 40010 01
[line 44] William WHITWORTH 110010 12010 01
[line 56] Reuben SCOTT 210110 30010 01
[1M 26-44 (b. 1776-1794) Reuben
1F 26-45 (b. 1776-1794) Mary
1M 10-15 (b. 1805-1810) Thomas?
3F 0-9 (b. 1811-1820) Nancy, Clary, and ??
2M 0-9 (b. 1811-1820) Allen and ??]
1M 26-44 (b. 1776-1794)]
pg. 215
Thomas SCOTT 300001 21010 01
pg. 207
Robert SCOOT? 300010 101 01
William SCOTT 000010 2001 01
pg. 195
William SCOTT 200010 201 01

1830 Monroe
pg. 785/393
[line 20] Jessee SCOTT 010001 22001
pg. 793/397
[line 18] Allen SCOTT 10011 00101
pg. 799/400
Reuben SCOTT 0110101 0011001
[1M 40-49 (b. 1781-1790) Reuben
1F 40-49 (b. 1781-1790) Mary
1M 20-29 (b. 1801-1810) Thomas?
1F 15-19 (b. 1811-1815)
1M 10-14 (b. 1816-1820)
1F 10-14 (b. 1816-1820) Clary
1F 5-9 (b. 1821-1825)]
pg. 401
[line 1] D.W. SCOTT 020001 100001

1830 St. Clair Co., IL
[line 23] Thomas SCOTT 0101301 0112001

1840 St. Clair Co., IL
pg. 286B, alloted to Augustus Cunrad D M
[line 19] Thomas SCOTT 00001001 0000001

1840 Monroe KY
Allen SCOTT 111011 110020000001 [1F 90-99]
1840 Cumberland KY
pg. 367
[line 17] Reuben SCOTT 31100001
[1M 50-59 (b. 1781-1790) Reuben
1M 10-14 (b. 1826-1830) Reuben
1M 5-9 (b. 1831-1835)
3M 0-4 (b. 1836-1840)]
[line 18] John SCOTT 10000000001 00010010001 [1M 80-89, 1F 80-89]
[line 20] Nathl SCOTT 123100001 1010001

http://www.rootsweb.com/~kygenweb/kybiog/metcalfe/scott.jh.txt, noted 20 September 2004
Kentucky: A History of the State, Battle, Perrin, & Kniffin, 3rd ed., 1886. Metcalfe County.

ELDER JOHN H. SCOTT was born December 18, 1832, in Monroe County, Ky. In childhood he removed with his mother to Cumberland County, where he was reared to manhood, and in 1869 located on South Fork of Little Barren River in Metcalfe County. His father, Thomas Scott, a native of Cumberland County, died in 1833. He was the son of Reuben Scott, who died about 1864. Thomas Scott married Elizabeth, daughter of John and Sallie (Scott) Kerr, of Monroe County, (now living, aged seventy-two years), and from their union sprang Elder John H. and Thomas. Mrs. Scott's second husband was James W. Lollar, and their children are JamesF., Isaac N., Sarah (Smith), Jesse, Lydia A. (Smith), Paulina E. (Sharp). Our subject's early advantages for obtaining an education were limited, but after arriving at the age of manhood, by hard study and close application, he improved his opportunities to the best advantage, having taught school several terms. He married, November 19, 1856, Julia F., daughter of William and Polly (Allen) Young, of Cumberland County, (born March 16, 1827), and to them have been born William T., James A., SusanJ., Sarah E., Mary H. (deceased), John H., Caleb S. and Julia A. In the commencement of his business career Mr. Scott had an even start with the world, having literally to "hoe his own row," but by industry and closeattention to business has secured a competency. He is owner of 207 acres of productive land, in a high state of cultivation. He is an elder in the Christian Church, and in politics afiliated with the Democratic party. 
Scott, Reuben (I13587)
 
40 1827, JUL 31 CHANDLER, Achilles marr. DEW, Cloe Family F5639
 
41 1830
WELLS, HUMPHREYS, 158 --- 10002 - 00001
WELLS, LEWIS, 158 --- 00011000001 - 20111001
WELLS, GEORGE, 160 --- 000110001 - 00021001

Pg. 188
[line 5] Thomas MITCHELL 0000010001 000020001
[line 6] Thomas MITCHELL Jr 00001 20001

WELLS, Israel, 190 --- 002001 - 2200001
[1M 30-39,
1F 40-49,
2M 10-14 (b. 1816-1820),
2F 5-9 (b. 1821-1825),
2F 0-4 (b. 1826-1830)]

1840 Greene
Northern Division of Greene County, Civil Dist 4 6 7 8 11 12 14 15 16 17
[line 19] Israel WELLS 0000201 00120001
[1M 40-49,
1F 50-59,
2M 20-29,
2F 15-19,
1F 10-14]

1840 Greene Co., TN Census
Israel Wells lives near Lemuel Jones, who was bondsman for Allen Wells' marriage

1840 Greene TN
image 45

image 51
Adam DODD
image 60
Humphrey WELLS
image 70
John J MITCHELL
image 76
Jas PEARCE
Joseph HENDRY
image 78
Jotham BROWN
Moses BROWN
Campbell TUCKER
David BROWN
William BROWN
image 84
John BROWN
Thornton HENDREY
Gabriel HENDRY
image 86
Thom COX
image 88
Silvenas BROWN
Hervy BROWN
Aron CRUMLY
Wm BROWN
Christopher COOPER
image 90
Robt ELIOTT
image 92
Browns
image 94
LA COX
Joseph HENERY?
image 98
Browns
image 104
Hugh BROWN
Jothem BROWN
Robt BROWN
image 106
John DODD Esq
Wm DODD
image 110
Nathan DODD
Anthony DODD
image 112
Richard PEARCE
image 114
Jonathan PEARCE
image 116
Thomas DODD
Jno Dodd
image 128
David MITCHEL
Hannah HENDREY
image 130
Thomas PEARCE
image 136
Jno HENDREY
Sharwood HATLEY
Rily COX
Harmon KENNEY
image 138
(same page as Reuben Cox)
Israel WELLS
image 142
Allen WELLS
image 148
Ausburn WELLS
Wm WELLS 
Wells, Mr. (I5440)
 
42 1830 Green
CURRY William 000001 30001
CURRY Saml 10100001 01001 
Curry, William (I12373)
 
43 1830 Hickman Co., Ky
http://www.rootsweb.com/~usgenweb/ky/hickman/census/1830/0025a.jpg
pg. 25 [line 11] EVERT James 000011001 00020001
1M 60-69 (b. 1761-1770) James
1F 50-59 (b. 1771-1780)
1M 30-39 (b. 1791-1800) James
1M 20-29 (b. 1801-1810) ?Henry?
2F 15-19 (b. 1811-1815) Nancy & ?

pg. 25 [line 12] EVERT Lemuel 21001 00001
1M 20-29 (b. 1801-1810) Lemuel
1F 20-29 (b. 1801-1810) Elizabeth
1M 5-9 (b. 1821-1825) ?
2M 0-4 (b. 1826-1830) Henry &

1840 Hickman Co., KY
pg. 316, line 25, EVERETT James 100001 0001
1M 30-39 (b. 1801-1810) James
1F 15-19 (b. 1821-1825) Sarah
1M 0-4 (b. 1836-1840) Bailey

1840 Hickman Co., KY
pg. 327, line 9, MILLINER D. H. 0001010001 011001
2 employed in agriculture, 1 Manufacturing trade
1M 30-39 (b. 1801-1810) Demarcus
1F 30-39 (b. 1801-1810) Nancy
1M 15-19 (b. 1821-1825) John Everett?
1F 10-14 (b. 1826-1830)
1F 5-9 (b. 1831-1835) Polly Everett?
1M 70-79 (b. 1761-1770) James Everett?

1850 Federal Census, Graves County, Kentucky
460 Henry Everett 23 Farmer NC
460 Elisha Everitt 50 Farmer KY
482 E. Everett 50 Farmer NC

1850 Federal Census, Hickman County, Kentucky
003 Evlly Everett 16 NC//this is Polly
011 Larry Everett 63 Farmer NC

1850 Weakley Co., TN Census
http://www.rootsweb.com/~tnweakle/census/1850_12.htm
L. Everett 33 M 800 NC
Matilda 25 F KY
John 8 M TN
Green 1 M TN
http://www.rootsweb.com/~tnweakle/1843groomD_F.htm
Weakley Co., TN Marriage records
Everett, E.G. m. Busy, M.S. license: 7 Dec 1846 marriage: 10 Dec 1846return: 10 Jan 1847

genforum.com
Re: Everetts of KY and TN
Posted by: Tom Everett tomeverett@mvtel.net
Date: March 19, 2001 at 20:44:41
In Reply to: Everetts of KY and TN by Anne Schnipper

I have been looking for someone who has info. on a Lemuel Everett bornabt. 1800 NC. His wife is Elizabeth and their children are Lucinda,Nancy, Henry W.,Francis M., Jessee, Marius, John and Sarah as in the 1850Henry Co.TN census. Lemuel is a brother to my g-g-grandfather JamesEverett born 1809 NC. The 1830 census Hickman Co.KY list a James Evertand a Lemuel Evert. Than in 1840 Lemuel was lived in Weakley Co. TN. The1850 census list Lemuel in Henry Co.TN. Than in the 1860 census of WrightCo.MO it list a James Everett, Lemuel Everett and a John B. Everett.Jamesand Lemuel may have brothers named Thomas, William and Lawrence? If youcan help me Thank You so much!! I will be glad to help in any way I can.

Tom Everett

http://kentuckyexplorer.com/nonmembers/Sept98Queries.html
Everett

How were James Everett, b. 1810 N. C., lived in Graves Co., Ky., relatedto Lemuel Everett, b. 1800, N.C., lived in Henry Co., Tenn.? They wereboth living in Wright Co., Mo. in 1860. Any info. appreciated.

Charlotte Austin
9119 E. State Highway DD
Strafford, MO 65757 
Everett, James (I7467)
 
44 1830 Hickman Co., Ky
pg. 25 [line 11] EVERT James 000011001 000200001
1M 60-69 (b. 1761-1770) James
1F 50-59 (b. 1771-1780)
1M 30-39 (b. 1791-1800)
1M 20-29 (b. 1801-1810)
2F 15-19 (b. 1811-1815) Nancy & ?
pg. 25 (line 12] EVERT Lemuel 210010 00001

1840 Hickman Co., KY
pg. 316, line 25, EVERETT James 100001 0001
1M 30-39
1F 15-19 (b. 1821-1825)
1M 0-4
pg. 327, line 9, MILLINER D. H. 0001010001 011001
2 employed in agriculture, 1 Manufacturing trade
1M 30-39 (b. 1801-1810) Demarcus
1F 30-39 (b. 1801-1810) Nancy
1M 15-19 (b. 1821-1825) John Everett?
1F 10-14 (b. 1826-1830)
1F 5-9 (b. 1831-1835) Polly Everett?
1M 70-79 (b. 1761-1770) James Everett?

1840 Hickman Co., KY
pg. 329, line 3, EVERETT William 12210001 0111001
1M 50-59 (b. 1781-1790) William
1F 40-49 (b. 1791-1800) Christian
1M 15-19 (b. 1821-1825) Lawrence
1F 15-19 (b. 1821-1825)
2M 10-14 (b. 1826-1830)
1F 10-14 (b. 1826-1830) Margaret
2M 5-9 (b. 1831-1835) William
1F 5-9 (b. 1831-1835) Nancy
1M 0-4 (b. 1836-1840) Richmond

ftp://ftp.rootsweb.com/pub/usgenweb/ky/fulton/census/1850/pg0121b.txt
37 212 212 EVERETT William 64 M Farmer N. C. cannot r/w
Christian 56 F England
Lawrence 30 M Labourer N. C.
Margaret 23 F Do
William 19 M Do
Nancy 16 F Ky
PAGE NO: 125A
line 1, EVERETT Richmond 14 M Do[Ky]

1840 Hickman Co., KY
pg. 317, line 2, EVERETT Lawrence 20202001 2010001
1M 50-59 (b. 1781-1790) Lawrence
1F 40-49 (b. 1791-1800) Nancy
2M 20-29 (b. 1811-1820) John A.
1F 10-14 (b. 1826-1830) Mary A.
2M 10-14 (b. 1826-1830) Lawrence
1F 0-4 (b. 1836-1840) Sarah
2M 0-4 (b. 1836-1840) Benjamin & James

http://www.rootsweb.com/~usgenweb/ky/hickman/census/1850/0011a.jpg
line 25, 148/153, Larry EVERETT 63 M Do [Farmer] 2600 NC cannot r/w
Nancy 56 F Scotland cannot r/w
John A. 30 M Do [Farmer] NC
Lawrance 24 M Do [Farmer] Do [NC]
Mary A 19 F Tenn attended school
Sarah J 15 F Ky attended school
Benjamin 13 M Do [Ky] attended school
James M 10 M Do [Ky] attended school
Mary STATIONS? 6 M Do [Ky] 
Everett, Nancy F. G. (I6934)
 
45 1830 Pike Co., MO Census
SWIFT, George 10001 10001
SWIFT, Nathan 10001 10001 
Swift, Patsy (I6909)
 
46 1840 Franklin Co., IN Census
http://www.rootsweb.com/~infrankl/1840ind.html
Carr, William 295
Care, Henery 326
Care, William R. 326

William Karr and Sarah Guymon is:
William H. Carr, born in Indiana; died 14 November 1837. 
Carr, William (I1847)
 
47 1840 Greene
John DOdd Jr image 45 
Dodd, John (I4863)
 
48 1840 Hancock
Union Twp., by John Milroy, pg. 212
[line 27] James REEVES 00000001 01000001
[line 28] Harland REEVES 10001 10001
[line 29] Elijah LEARY 00001 211001
[line 30] George REEVES 100001 010001
1840 Hancock
Union Twp., by John Milroy, pg. 214
[line 1] Levi LEAKEY 01001 1000101
[line 5] Eli REEVES 200001 00001
[line 10] James H. LEARY 00001 10001
[line 14] Sarah LEARY 0001 00000001
1840 Hancock
Jackson Twp., by John Milroy, pg. 190
[line 3] Jordan LEARY 1210001 0100101

Center Twp., Page No. 34/602
8 June 1860 by Jonathan Dunbar
P.O. Greenfield
line 1, 257/243 George REEVES 53 M Farmer 1500/240 N.Carolina
Jane REEVES 50 F do [N.Carolina]
Benjamin WOODS 19 M Farm laborer Indiana
Elizabeth WOODS 14 F do [Indiana]
William H. WOODS 12 M do [Indiana]
Margaret I. WOODS 7 F do [Indiana]

Center Twp.
Page No. 41/352A
28 July 1870 by Lee O. Harris
P.O. Greenfield Ind
line 26, 311/315 WOOD Benjamin F 29 MW Farmer 2000/700 Indiana
Mary E 21 FW Keeping house Indiana
Amanda 2 FW Indiana
William 22 MW works on farm Indiana
REEVES Jane 50 FW North Carolina
WOOD Elizabeth 23 FW Indiana
Margaret 18 FW Indiana attended school 
Reeves, George (I1866)
 
49 1840 Hancock Co., IN Census
4th District, Hancock County, Greenfield, Center Township, allotted toJohn Milroy, pg. 233/450
[line 6] George TAGUE 00110001 00010001 [1M 50-59 (b. 1781-1790) George,1F 50-59 (b. 1781-1790), 1M 15-19 (b. 1821-1825), 1F 15-19 (b.1821-1825), 1M 10-14 (b. 1826-1830) George G.]
pg. 236/456
[line 7] Jacob TAGUE 1100001 112001 [1M 40-49 (b. 1791-1800) Jacob, 1F30-39 (b. 1801-1810) Mary, 2F 10-14 (b. 1826-1830), 1M 5-9 (b. 1831-1835)George, 1F 5-9 (b. 1831-1835) Elizabeth, 1M 0-4 (b. 1836-1840), 1F 0-4(b. 1836-1840)]

Chapman Nancy / Tage George Hancock 10-17-1847

Centre Twp., pg. 170A
10 September 1850 by Jas Rutherford
line 2, 85/87 George TAGUE 62 M Farmer 3500 North Carolina
Nancy " 46 F Kentucky
Scinda CHAPMAN 14 F Arkansas attended school [married Cyrus W. Crevistonin 1851]

Hancock
Greenfield Center Township, Page No. 575
1 June 1860 by J Dunbar
P.O. Greenfield Indi.
line 25, 54/54 George TAGUE 72 M Retired Farmer 3000/100 North Carolina
Nancy TAGUE 50 F Kentucky

Center Twp.
Page No. 55, pg. 359A
2 August 1870 by Lee O. Harris
P.O. Greenfield Ind
line 13, 417/418 TAGUE George 82 MW Retired Farmer 6400/1400 NorthCarolina
Nancy 66 FW Keeping house Kentucky
line 15, 417/419 WIGGINS, Abram 59 MW Farmer /350 Kentucky
Jane 56 FW Keeping house Kentucky
Sarah J 24 FW Indiana 
Teague, George (I1683)
 
50 1840 Washington Co Ark
William Woolsey
http://content.ancestry.com/Browse/view.aspx?dbid=8057&path=Arkansas.Washington.Prairie.19&rc=&zp=50
this one appears to be the one married to Elvira:
http://content.ancestry.com/Browse/view.aspx?dbid=8057&path=Arkansas.Washington.Prairie.3&rc=&zp=50
same page as Charlotte Joy McMillen

One with wife Elvira in Washington Co Ark 1850
https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-267-11109-9070-77?cc=1401638

This appears to the son of William and Mary A. Thompson Woolsey:
http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~woolsey/resources/descends/woolgen/wltemple1811_1898.html
noted 7 Nov 2011
1880 June 23, Lockhart, Pike, Indiana, Dist 172, Dist 172, a370/390
Woolsey, Temple, w, m, 68, mrd, farmer, KY, VA, VA
Woolsey, Lear, w, f, 42, wife, mrs, keeping house, IN, IN, IN
Beech, Levi, w, m, 22, step-son, s, school teacher, IN, IN, IN
Woolsey, Alice, w, f, 16, dau, s, at school, attending school, IN, KY, IN
Woolsey, Carrie, w, f, 14, dau, s, at home,attending school, IN, KY, IN
Woolsey, Parmelia, w, f, 12, dau, at home,attending school, IN, KY, IN
Woolsey, Leoti, w, f, 10, dau, s, attending school, IN, KY, IN
Woolsey, Milard, w, m, 7, son, s, IN, KY, IN, attending school,
Woolsey, Morton, w, m, 3, son, s, IN, KY, IN

Neighbors at Dist 172, a374/395
Woolsey, John, w, m, 25, mrd, farmer, IN, KY, KY, cannot write
Son of William Woolsey and Mary Ann Gibson
Woolsey, Sarah, w, f, 19, wife, mrd, keeping house, IN, KY, KY 
Woolsey, William (I8106)
 

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